This week the Desketeers are remaining pretty true to form.  No big surprises this week.  I think we are still a tad waterlogged.

The offerings are as follows:  red, not pickled herrings, polygamy, a dabbling in a nasty business, an abandoned book, times gone by, and some healing.

Let us begin!

Abby wants to remind us all that “It's no secret I'm a fan of Scandinavian crime fiction and have really enjoyed Norwegian author Jo Nesbo's Detective Harry Hole series.  Headhunters is a standalone novel.  Roger Brown is the top corporate headhunter in Norway.  What he lacks in height he more than makes up for with ego, a sweet car, and exceptionally good hair.  Height is actually an obsession with him as it factors in strongly when considering job candidates and just about everything else. Roger has a lovely (tall) wife, and appears to have everything...except money to finance their lifestyle.  A smart fellow, he comes up with a risky way to keep him and his wife in the style they have become accustomed. There are lots of twists and turns in the story, which become a bit much.  In the end I felt Nesbo was somewhat self-congratulatory about what a clever writer he is to have come up with this plot.    It has some very nice Holy Cow moments along the way, but overall, a bit too many tricks and red herrings.”

 



Citizen Asha reports, “I am reading Love Times Three: Our True Story of a Polygamous Marriage. The book is about the Mormon family (Joe, Vicki, Valerie and Alina Darger) who inspired the HBO series Big Love. As a fan of the television show it was fascinating to read about the actual people, sadly it’s not as risqué and drama filled as the show. They live a fairly normal life; PTAs, minivans and blackberries which offers a different view of Mormonism. I just started reading Johannes Cabal: The Detective by Jonathan L. Howard. I am a major fan of Johannes Cabal. He is witty, cranky, arrogant, amoral and he also dabbles in necromancy but don’t hold it against it him. Cabal just wants to practice his experiments in peace and yet, he always finds himself in trouble. Apparently necromancy is not considered a proper way to make a living. Who knew?”

 


Barbara M. weighs in with the following: “I have done something I do not do easily. I just stopped reading The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht. What started as a somewhat interesting book turned into a very strange disjointed one two thirds through and so I abandoned it. I have just begun Still Alice by Lisa Genova about a woman experiencing early onset Alzheimer’s disease and it promises to be a more satisfying read. “

 

 

 

Pat T. has just  “finished listening to the audio book Rules of Civility by Amor Towles, and I would highly recommend this audio book because the narrator had the perfect voice for the book's main character, Katey Kontent. It is a good story that realistically depicts the era, styles, and the well-to-do and working singles of the late 1930s and early '40s just as the nation is coming out of the grips of the Depression into a robust manufacturing economy before World War II.”

 

 


I am in love with The Healing which is due out in February.  When the mistress of the plantation has a breakdown after her 12 year old daughter dies she takes in a new born slave baby and renames her Grenada.  Master Satterfield has not only his wife’s increasingly fragile mental state and opium addiction to worry about. Something is causing his field hands to die off in large numbers.  He buys Polly Shine who is a healer to help determine what can be done to halt the epidemic.  In Grenada, Polly recognizes a fellow healer and proceeds to apprentice her.  

Have a great weekend!