This week we have involved readers, Paris (you know you missed it last week!), a gatekeeper from Da Bronx, a He who is really a She, white shoes before Memorial Day (horrors!), kid lit, and a new phobia.


Let us begin!


Marianne wants everyone to know about The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot Livesey.  “I read this as an advanced readers' copy and really did like it.  The author's reinvention of the Jane Eyre story held my interest while in some parts I did have a hard time believing that people would revert to such evil and antiquated tactics in modern day England.  After I finished I passed it on to a friend who thoroughly enjoyed it, but took great exception to all of the comparisons to 'Jane Eyre.'   She felt the story really stood on its own.   In fact she was so unhappy about it she emailed the publisher and asked the firm stop advertising the book as a modern 'Jane Eyre.'  Now, that's what I call an involved reader!”


I am sure it will come as no surprise to those of you out there keeping score that Barbara M. is back in Paris.  In her mind anyway.  “I'm reading Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting by Pamela Druckerman about the differences between French and American child rearing as seen through the eyes of an American living in Paris. Druckerman is sometimes repetitive but the book is interesting.”


Pat T. has just finished reading "Fairytale Interrupted: A Memoir of Life, Love and Loss by Rosemarie Terenzio. “In this memoir the author shares her five years as John F. Kennedy JR's personal assistant, confidante, friend, and the overall gatekeeper of his personal and business affairs. She was the tough Bronx girl from a struggling Italian family who landed this plum job that changed her life forever.”


Citizen Asha is oddly enough, reading something almost normal.  “I am currently reading Albert Nobbs by George Moore. I wanted to see the movie but was unable to, so I thought I would read the book. It’s set in Dublin, Nobbs is a waiter with a secret; he is actually a she. The novel is filled with great sadness; she’s abandoned by parents, fearful of men, and has bouts of depression.  A great read, now I am anxious to see the movie. “


Abby
reports that she is “enjoying Heart Of A Killer the latest mystery-light from David Rosenfelt (outside of his regular Andy Carpenter series).  While he raises interesting legal points in this novel, he manages to incorporate humor and a nice touch of humanity.  When a mom convicted of murdering her husband asks to be permitted to donate her heart to her ailing child, her case goes out pro bono to Jamie Wagner, a Harvard trained desk jockey at a white shoe law firm. Questions about the original murder case begin to get explored as Jaime's best strategy appears to be getting his client out of jail so she can then end her own life to save her child.  Looking forward to seeing how this one ends.

Jeanne is taking a class on Kid Lit for her MLS.  She says that, “The Invention of Hugo Cabret took my breath away! “  The rest of us in RA who have seen the movie release this week can understand her love for the story.


A friend of mine, Laurie W. (aka The Rye),  insisted I pick up a copy of “Sometime I Feel Like a Nut Essays and Observations by Jill Kargman.  The chapter on what she is afraid of is totally hilarious because honestly?  While I can totally relate to not feeling entirely comfortable around clowns and mimes, she has now totally sold me on being wary around vans too.  This one is lots of fun.

 

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