If you’re of a certain age, you may have fond memories of the 1964-1965 World’s Fair, held in Flushing Meadows. Over 50 million fairgoers remember the enormous Unisphere, “It’s a Small World,” the first look at touch-tone phones, color TV, and the Ford Mustang, the giant Uniroyal tire, Pop Art graphics, and the sweet taste of Bel-Gem waffles.

Behind the dazzling scenery, though, is a story of politics, the burgeoning Civil Rights movement, and unprecedented cultural change. The Fair took place just as the 60s were moving from black and white to color. Joseph Tirella's new book Tomorrow-land explains how the 1964-1965 World's Fair was never officially approved by the Bureau of International Expositions, details the passive-aggressive tactics of Robert Moses, and provides full perspective on this milestone event.

The pavilions were dismantled, artifacts sent to museums or in some cases lost forever, but the memories and history remain. Tomorrow-land brings us back to yesterday, when the future seemed unlimited, bright, and just around the corner. Nearly 50 years later, you can almost smell those delicious waffles in the air still...