Dealing with Bullies Booklist

photo courtesy of Flickr user Eddie~S

From pushes on the playground to mean instant messaging, bullying is an issue that almost all children face at some time or another.  With a recent surge in media attention and a new focus on cyber-bullying, parents may wonder where and how to find the best information and ways of talking to their own kids about bullies. 

What if my child is the victim of bullying?

A recent article in Parenting magazine offered the following 3 Step process for parents:

Step One: Find out what's going on.  Get the facts and reassure your child that you will both work together on a solution.

Step Two: Help your child figure out how to respond.  Some responses include:

  •  Stand tall and act brave
  •  Ignore the bully
  •  Stick with friends
  •  Tell an Adult

Step Three:  Take action yourself.  Set up a meeting with the teacher, parent, or caregiver. 

What if my child's friend is the bully?

One of the hardest things for a child to learn is how to stand up for what's right, even in the face of possible scrutiny or embarassment. 

The US Department of Health and Human Services has a kid-friendly website called Stop Bullying Now that features info, games, quizzes, and webisodes all designed to address the issues of bullying , offer meaningful discussion starters, and help promote positive ways of combatting this childhood problem.  Check out this video featuring the character Melanie and her struggle with a friend who is a known bully.

What if my child is the bully?

It can sometimes be hard to tell if childhood squabbles are simply "kids being kids" or if there is a more serious problem.  

Stop Bullying Now offers the following advice to parents:

  • Make it clear to your child that you take bullying seriously and that you will not tolerate this behavior.
  • Develop clear and consistent rules within your family for your children's behavior. Praise and reinforce your children for following rules and use non-physical, non hostile consequences for rule violations.
  • Spend more time with your child and carefully supervise and monitor his or her activities. Find out who your child's friends are and how and where they spend free time.
  • Build on your child's talents by encouraging him or her to get involved in prosocial activities (such as clubs, music lessons, nonviolent sports).
  • Share your concerns with your child's teacher, counselor, or principal. Work together to send clear messages to your child that his or her bullying must stop.
  • If you or your child needs additional help, talk with a school counselor or mental health professional.

The Children's Library also offers some great books for both children and parents on the subject of bullying.  These are a few of our favorites: 

 

Take a Stand!

Stand Against Racism is a movement by the YWCA to eliminate racism in our world.
Stand Against Racism is a movement by the YWCA to eliminate racism in our world.

On Friday, April 27, Darien Library helped to bring awareness to Stand Against Racism, an initiative by the YWCA to eliminate racism.

The Children's Library has compiled a booklist that helps celebrate our differences. Stop by next week to see our Stand Against Racism display and check out some of these important books.

New F5 Faves Section: Caldecott Winners!

Announcing a new F5 Faves Section - Caldecott Winners!
Announcing a new F5 Faves Section - Caldecott Winners!

The Randolph Caldecott award is "awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children" (the American Library Association). The award is now in its 75th year and still remains the highest honor given to illustrators in the United States.

We're pleased to announce that Darien Library now has all the Caldecott Award winning books in one section - a new section of F5 Favorites!

In the previous home of F5 Concepts, you'll find all the Caldecott winning books from 1938 through the present. We can't wait to share these forever classics with you and your family!

App Chat with the Children's Librarians

Miss Claire demonstrates some great apps.
Miss Claire demonstrates some great apps.

On Thursday, the children's librarians hosted an App Chat. A small but enthusiastic group of parents met with Miss Kiera and Miss Claire to hear about great new apps for all ages and share their own favorites.

Click to view and print the handouts:

Awesome Apps for ages 2 to 5

Awesome Apps for ages 6 to 8

Awesome Apps for ages 9 to 12

What are some of your favorite apps- for children or grownups? Share them in the comments below!

Our Favorite Parenting Blogs

"I'm totally gonna Tweet about this blog."

Whether you're sporting your first baby bump or expecting your third little bundle of joy, chances are there is a parenting blog out there that you'll love. Moms, dads, and caregivers can trade tips, tricks, day-in-the-life adventures, and even shopping bargains through social media platforms like blogs. Here are a few of our favorite parenting blogs:

Pregnant Chicken: Laugh-out-loud funny observations and straightforward information for new parents.

Cool Mom Picks: Real Simple named this shopping blog as one of their top three. The bloggers curate list of great gifts, craft ideas, and products for both baby and mom- so you don't have to. 

OhDeeDoh: From the creators of Apartment Therapy comes this interior design blog that has tips on everything from home improvement projects, to setting up a nursery, to converting a child's bedroom into a cool teen space. 

Babble: More of a parenting website than a blog per se, Babble is a fount of information on everything from taming tantrums to having "The Talk." They also feature some great personal mom/dad blogs.

Autism Spot: An empowering and positive blog with information for parents of children with autism or other sensory integration disorders. Contains news about scientific studies and trials, activities for sensory and social development, and support forums.  

Geek Dad: Several dads (and sometimes moms, too!) contribute to this fun, tech-savvy Wired blog for parents. From books, to video games, to Lego competitions, there is no shortage of great, geeky ideas.

Our Family Eats: Looking for a quick, healthy, and delicious dinner idea? Pop over to this practical foodie blog for busy chefs. 

Radical Parenting: Believe it or not, this insightful and informative blog is not written by parents- but by a group of teen writers. Started by Vanessa Van Petten at age 16, the site is now home to over 120 teen contributors. For an inside look at the brain of a teenager, this is an invaluable resource for moms and dads.  

Did you know we have some amazing parent bloggers right here in Darien? Check out these local mom bloggers and come meet them in person at the Tech Moms panel event next Wednesday, February 15 at 9:30am

Lisa Boncheck Adams (LisaBAdams.com): Writings on breast cancer, grief & loss, life, and family.

Nicole Lyons (All About Darien): A "good-to-know" guide for and about everything Darien.

Jacquie (Afterwordsblog.com): Funny, poignant tales of a transplanted Brooklynite (now Darienite) living with her husband and two kids ("The Boy" and "The Girl") in suburbia. 

Jennifer St. Jean (Itty Bitty Bag): Owner and creator of the Itty Bitty Bag company, this Darien mom is a craft and sewing goddess- she can even give detailed instructions how to hem a pleated jumper! 

Have a favorite parenting blog that we missed? Share it in the comments section below!

 

photo courtesy of Flickr user miguelphotobooth.

 

Cyber Parents & Digital Natives

A Technology Series for the Modern Family.

 

From social networks to cloud computing, technology has changed the way families connect and communicate. Darien Library presents a series of programs and special events exploring the role of technology in the lives of parents and children. See below for individual events and registration information.

Registration is now open!

Programs for Parents

Programs for Children

Programs for the Whole Family

All Programs in this Series

 

 

Great Websites for Kids

 Looking for fun and educational websites for kids? The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), which is a division of the American Library Association, just launched a fantastic, newly-designed resource: Great Websites for Kids

The site compiles exemplary websites geared to children from birth to age 14 and are selected by a committee of librarians from around the country. To help narrow down the many choices and select only the best of the best, the committee uses the following guidelines (adapted from the Great Websites for Kids Selection Criteria): 

 

 

How to Tell if You Are Looking at a Great Website

  • Author/Sponsorship: Who Put Up the Site?
  • Purpose: Every Site Has a Reason for Being There.
  • Design and Stability: A Great Site Has Personality and Strength of Character.
  • Content: A Great Site Shares Meaningful and Useful Content that Educates, Informs, or Entertains.

More Gift-Giving Suggestions from the Children's Library

The Children's Librarians have chosen new books that make great gifts for the little ones in your life, whether they're being read to, starting to read themselves, or are already non-stop, voracious readers. 

The following are a couple of ideas that aren't yet in the Children's Library collection, but will be soon.

For parents who want to introduce their babies to the music they love, there are Rockabye Baby CDs.  Imagine Aerosmith, The Flaming Lips, The Cure, Lady Gaga, and more played on the harp and xylophone.  Ultra-soothing and enjoyable for both kids and adults.

 

 

 

It's A Little Book by Lane Smith is a conversation between two baby animals about what to do with a book:  it's not for e-mailing or eating or building, it's for reading.  Fun, tongue-in-cheek humor for kids and grown-ups whose lives are filled with technology.  Check out the book trailer here.  The original, It's A Book, is available at the library.

 

 

 Click on the link below to see our other titles (many of which are series)!

You'll Like This Picturebook

Oliver Jeffers' new book, Stuck, starts out simply and gets out of hand very quickly, with very funny and unexpected twists. 

Poor Floyd's kite gets stuck in a tree behind his house.  To get it out, he throws his shoe...which also gets caught in the tree.  He throws his other shoe (it gets stuck), then his cat Mitch (he gets stuck), then goes to get a ladder...and hurls it into the tree (yep, it gets stuck, too).  By the end of the story, a fire engine (and its firemen), a lighthouse, the house across the street, and a whale are all stuck in the tree.  How does it all end?  Does Floyd get everything out of the tree?  You'll get a kick out of the surprise ending. 

Kids with big imaginations, who like big stories and silly ideas, will love this story, and the grown-ups who read it to them will like it, too. 

Attention, World Travelers!

 

Psst! Are you a kid planning on traveling to a big city? Or are you kid who would like to someday travel to a big city? Then we have some books written just for you - The Lonely Planet Not-For-Parents Guides to London, Rome, Paris, and New York City are now available in the Children's Library!

And if you're interested in traveling to even more exoctic locations, we have The Lonely Planet Not-For-Parents Travel Book, featuring "cool stuff to know about every country in the world!"

 To learn more, click on the link below!

 

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