You'll Like This Picturebook

Oliver Jeffers' new book, Stuck, starts out simply and gets out of hand very quickly, with very funny and unexpected twists. 

Poor Floyd's kite gets stuck in a tree behind his house.  To get it out, he throws his shoe...which also gets caught in the tree.  He throws his other shoe (it gets stuck), then his cat Mitch (he gets stuck), then goes to get a ladder...and hurls it into the tree (yep, it gets stuck, too).  By the end of the story, a fire engine (and its firemen), a lighthouse, the house across the street, and a whale are all stuck in the tree.  How does it all end?  Does Floyd get everything out of the tree?  You'll get a kick out of the surprise ending. 

Kids with big imaginations, who like big stories and silly ideas, will love this story, and the grown-ups who read it to them will like it, too. 

Attention, World Travelers!

 

Psst! Are you a kid planning on traveling to a big city? Or are you kid who would like to someday travel to a big city? Then we have some books written just for you - The Lonely Planet Not-For-Parents Guides to London, Rome, Paris, and New York City are now available in the Children's Library!

And if you're interested in traveling to even more exoctic locations, we have The Lonely Planet Not-For-Parents Travel Book, featuring "cool stuff to know about every country in the world!"

 To learn more, click on the link below!

 

Animorphs Are Back!

 

 

Scholastic recently reissued the first three Animorph books, about a group of friends who witness a strange light fall from the sky and are granted the power to transform into the most dangerous animals on earth. Their mission? To fight an evil alien plague bent on taking over humanity - from inside our bodies!

This was one of Miss Elisabeth's all-time favorite series when she was in elementary school, and she is thrilled to introduce this sci-fiction series to a new generation!

To learn more, check out the link below!

Sequels to Booktalking Titles!

Summer's over, but the books you liked reading then...now have sequels!  Find out what your favorite characters are up to now:  What kind of trouble is Squish getting into?  What mystery will Bethesda solve now that she knows Ms. Finkleman's story?  Find out by clicking on the link below.

Can't remember the booktalking books, take a look at the lists again here.

Fantasy Friday: Breadcrumbs

Fantasy Friday (and new book alert!): Breadcrumbs  by Anne Ursu.

"It snowed right before Jack stopped talking to Hazel, fluffy white flakes big enough to show their crystal architecture, like perfect geometric poems. It was the sort of snow that transforms the world into a different kind of place. You know what it's like - when you wake up  to find everything white and soft and quiet, when you run outisde and your breath suddenly appears before you in a smoky poof, when  you wonder for a moment if the world in which you woke up is nt the same one that you went to bed in the night before. Things like that happen, at least in the stories you read. It was the sort of snowfall that, if there were any magic to be had in the world, would make it come out. And magic did come out."

Unfortunately, the magic that comes out of that wonderful, marvelous, story book snow is evil magic- in the form of The Snow Queen. She spirits Jack away from Hazel and everyone he knows into a deep, dark forest. And even though Jack has stopped talking to Hazel, she is still his best friend. Best friends save each other, no matter what.

This marvelous, magical retelling of Hans Christian Anderson's The Snow Queen is a must-read for anyone who loves a heroic, epic adventure, dazzling fantasy worlds, and a character who's learning what it means to grow up.

Raising Our Sons and Daughters - A Parenting Program for the New School Year


As a parent, do you: 


• Worry that you are not doing enough?
• Struggle with embarrassing issues?
• Seek ways to reduce power struggles?
• Want to do everything you can to be
 an effective and competent parent?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parents of boys and girls in 3rd and 4th grades are invited to join this monthly Parent Discussion Group held in the Darien Library Conference Room. Using the Raising Our Sons and Raising Our Daughters parenting guides, you will meet monthly with other parents with children of the same age/gender. This program is designed to be a pro-active approach to prepare for the tween and teen years.

Wednesdays, 10 to 11:30 AM

The first session will meet on Wednesday, October 12 at 10 AM in the Library's Conference Room.

 

 

Darien Library is a member of Thriving Youth: Connected Community, an initiative of the Human Services Planning Council for developmental asset building through meaningful relationships, experiences, skills and opportunities that benefit all our children. Thriving Youth: Connected Community is a movement in Darien to address the needs of our young people which were brought to light in the Fall when the Search Institute conducted the 40 Developmental Assets survey in our Middle and High Schools. If you missed the results when they were announced you can still view the presentation as a pdf here. Some of the sessions will be facilitated by Moira Rizzo, LMFT.

To see the list of Developmental Assets that will be discussed in this series, click here. To learn more about the Raising Our Sons and Daughters program, visit the Family Empowerment Network's website.

Space is limited - Register online here, or by calling the Children's Library at (203) 669-5235.

Jefferson's Sons, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

In her new book, Jefferson's Sons, Kimberly Brubaker Bradley does something truly remarkable. She takes a complicated and controversial idea, that Thomas Jefferson had children by his slave Sally Hemmings, and writes about it in a simple, eloquent way that children can understand.

This book is definitely for advanced readers. The themes it tackles are complex and readers need a working knowledge of early US history to understand the world that Beverly, Harriet, Madison, and Eston live in. The story does not shy away from the horrors of slavery - families are broken apart, friends are sold, and slaves who run away are punished when they are caught. However, by presenting the book from the perspectives of children, Bradley is able to convey her story without graphic details.

This book is generating a lot of Newbery buzz for its honesty and the high quality of its storytelling. There is a recomended reading list at the back of the book, and Bradley writes an afterword in which she details how she did her research and where she located most of her information (in primary sources from Monticello.org).

I would recomend that parents read this book themselves if they have a child who would like to check it out, as it is a tale likely to generate a large amount of discussion.

Further reviews can be found here , here, and here. Highly recomended for children 9+.

 

Looking to Start Your Own Book Club? Try Our Kids Book Club Kits!

Kids Book Club Kits

Kids and parents can easily host their own book clubs.  We'll get you started with multiple copies for your group, a discussion guide, and even a space to meet. 

Click HERE for all the details.

Early Literacy iPad Kits

If you and your children have been enjoying the Early Literacy iPad Kits along with the iPad mounted in the Children's Library, we have great news!  We recently revamped our kits to include newly acquired apps for you and your children to enjoy! We've also organized the apps, old and new, into convenient folders.

Updated list of Early Literacy iPad Apps

Additional resources on digital literacy and children

Place a hold on an Early Literacy iPad Kit

 

Syndicate content