Ask the Experts: Thriving (Not Just Surviving) Through Life Transitions

Thriving (Not Just Surviving) Through Life Transitions
Thriving (Not Just Surviving) Through Life Transitions

Tuesday, January 7 at 7 p.m.

Although life transitions are a normal part of living, they can be overwhelming. Whether the transition is a career change, divorce, kids leaving home, aging parents or the loss of a loved one, there is no GPS for navigating the journey. The Life Solution Center of Darien, a consortium of independent practices and businesses, was designed to help negotiate just these kinds of challenges. Founder and Executive Director Maud Purcell, MSW, LCSW, CEAP, will moderate a lively and informative discussion featuring the following panel of Life Solution Center experts:

- Donna Carlin, Career Consultant and Coach
- Lisa Gardner, MSW, LCSW, Couples Therapist
- Maurice Segall, JD, and Victoria Thomas, MS, Divorce Mediation and Financial Analysis
- Erica Jensen, Wardrobe Consultant
- Judy Stoddard, MSW, LCSW, Geriatric and Family Therapist

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs available on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Meet the Author - Patricia Wells

Patricia Wells
Patricia Wells

Wednesday, October 23 at 7 p.m.

Patricia Wells, author of The French Kitchen Cookbook: Recipes and Lessons from Paris and Provence, will be our featured speaker.

Focusing on the fresh, inspiring recipes and lessons from the much-coveted classes held in her beautiful homes in Paris and Provence, Patricia takes you into her life in France, telling the story of how her school began and the many memorable experiences she shared with family, friends, and students.

About the Author

Patricia Wells is a journalist, author, and teacher who runs a popular cooking school, At Home with Patricia Wells, in Paris and Provence. She has won the James Beard Award for The Provence Cookbook, Patricia Wells at Home in Provence, and Simply French. Also nominated for the James Beard Awards were Vegetable Harvest and The Paris Cookbook. Her other works include Simply Truffles, The Food Lover’s Guide to Paris, The Food Lover’s Guide to France, Bistro Cooking, Patricia Wells’ Trattoria, l’Atelier of Joel Robuchon, and with her husband, Walter, We’ve Always Had Paris…and Provence. The French government has honored her as a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, recognizing her contribution to French culture. A former New York Times reporter, she is the only foreigner and the only woman to serve as restaurant critic for a major French publication, L’Express. For more than twenty-five years she was the global restaurant critic for the International Herald Tribune.

Patricia Wells' appearance is made possible by Barrett Bookstore.

Books will be available for purchase at this event. Refreshments will be served.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs available on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Gardening with Nature: Forest Restoration and Native Plant Gardening at The New York Botanical Garden

flickr image courtesy Kristine Paulus
flickr image courtesy Kristine Paulus

Tuesday, October 22 at 7 p.m.

Todd Forrest will describe how the New York Botanical Garden’s approach to stewardship of the Forest has evolved from a policy of “let alone” to active restoration and discuss the ecological, educational, and research goals of the ongoing management program.

Todd Forrest oversees all aspects of the management and development of the Garden’s landmark 250-acre site, its glasshouses, and indoor and outdoor exhibitions, including the 50-acre Thain Family Forest, 50 gardens and plant collections, exhibitions in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, and outdoor art exhibitions. He manages a staff of 80 including managers, curators, gardeners, and community horticulturists. Todd has taken a leadership role in planning and implementing projects such as the construction of the Benenson Ornamental Conifers, restoration of the Ross Conifer Arboretum, the construction and planting of the 11-acre Azalea Garden, and the new Native Plant Garden. He advises on long-term strategy for future development of the Garden’s landscape, Conservatory and art exhibitions, seasonal events and displays of all kinds.

An advocate for historic trees, forests, urban landscapes, and public gardens, Forrest has written many articles and interpretative materials. He joined The New York Botanical Garden in 1997 as an intern and research assistant in the Science division before joining the Horticulture staff as Associate Curator of Woody Plants in 1999. Previously, Forrest worked at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University. A graduate of Wesleyan University, he has a Master of Forest Science degree from Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

This event is co-sponsored by the Tree Conservancy of Darien and the Darien Land Trust.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs available on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Friday Night Features in July

We will screen 42 on July 26.
We will screen 42 on July 26.

Friday, July 5 at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.Before Sunrise (1995) Starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy; Rated R; 101 minutes. Closed captioned for the hearing impaired.

Two strangers, a man and a woman in their twenties, meet on the Eurorail and spend a night exploring Vienna together.

For more information, please watch the film's trailer.

Friday, July 12 at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.The Giant Mechanical Man (2012) Starring Jenna Fischer, Chris Messina, and Topher Grace; Rated PG-13; 94 minutes. Closed captioned for the hearing impaired.

This is a charming comedic love story between Janice, a woman in her 30’s who has yet to learn how to navigate adulthood, and Tim, a devoted artist who finds that his unique talents as a silver-painted street performer don’t exactly pay the bills. Evicted from her apartment and forced to move in with her overbearing sister, Janice is on the receiving end of well-intentioned but misguided pressure to date an egotistical self-help guru. Everyone seems to know what’s best for Janice, but Tim helps her find her own voice and realize that it only takes one person to make you feel important.

For more information, please watch the film's trailer.

Friday, July 19 at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.Happy (2011) Documentary Feature; Not Rated; 78 minutes. Closed captioned for the hearing impaired.

Does money make you happy? Kids and family? Your work? Do you live in a world that values and promotes happiness and well-being? Are we in the midst of a happiness revolution? This film sets out to answer these questions and more. Taking us from the bayous of Louisiana to the deserts of Namibia, from the beaches of Brazil to the villages of Okinawa, Happy explores the secrets behind our most valued emotion.

For more information, please watch the film's trailer.

Friday, July 26 at 6:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. 42 (2013) Starring Harrison Ford, Chadwick Boseman, and Alan Tudyk; Rated PG-13; 128 minutes. Closed captioned for the hearing impaired.

Jackie Robinson's story is told in this biopic from writer/director Brian Helgeland. Robinson paved a new road for minorities by being the first African-American to play in Major League Baseball since the racial barrier was put in place in the late 1800s.

For more information, please watch the film's trailer.

All films are free and open to the public.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Meet the Author - Michael Paterniti

Michael Paterniti
Michael Paterniti

Wednesday, August 7 at 7 p.m.

Michael Paterniti, author of The Telling Room, will be our featured speaker. This event will include a cheese tasting by Fairfield Cheese Company.

In the fall of 1991, at Zingerman’s deli in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Michael Paterniti encountered a piece of cheese. Not just any cheese. This was Paramo de Guzmán, a rare Spanish queso, which was one of the most sought-after delicacies on earth. Paterniti travels to Spain and discovers that the story of this cheese is nothing like the idyllic slow-food fable he first imagined. Instead, he’s sucked into the heart of an unfolding mystery, a blood feud that includes accusations of betrayal and theft, death threats, and a murder plot. As the village begins to spill its long-held secrets, Paterniti finds himself implicated in the very story he is writing.

Praise for The Telling Room

“Michael Paterniti is one of the best living practitioners of the art of literary journalism, able to fully elucidate and humanize the everyday and the epic. In his hands, every subject, every moment of personal or global upheaval, is treated with the same curiosity, respect, empathy, and clear-eyed wisdom.” – Dave Eggers, author of A Hologram for the King

About the Author

Michael Paterniti's writing has appeared in publications including The New York Times Magazine, National Geographic, Harper's, Outside, Esquire, and GQ, where he works as a correspondent. He is the recipient of an NEA grant and two MacDowell Fellowships. His first book, Driving Mr. Albert, was a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year.” He lives in Portland, Maine, with his wife, Sara Corbett, and their three children.

Books will be available for purchase at this event. Refreshments will be served.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs available on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Friday Night Feature - 'Amour'

We will screen AMOUR September 6.
We will screen AMOUR September 6.

Friday, September 6 at 6:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m.Amour (2013) Starring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva; Rated PG-13; 127 minutes. Presented in French with English subtitles.

Georges and Anne are in their eighties. They are cultivated, retired music teachers. Their daughter, who is also a musician, lives abroad with her family. One day, Anne has an attack and the couple's bond of love is severely tested.

Academy Award Winner, Best Foreign Language Film

"Now at the end of the year comes a masterpiece, not just the best of the year, but one of the best ever: Michael Haneke's Amour." -- David Thomson, The New Republic

"A movie that is utterly worthy of its all-encompassing title." -- Ann Hornaday, Washington Post

For more information, please watch the film's trailer. Check out what else we're screening in September.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs available on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Back to the Future eBook Group: The War of the Worlds

image courtesy flick user Joe Shlabotnik
image courtesy flick user Joe Shlabotnik

Thursday, August 8 at 7 p.m.

Join us for this staff-led discussion of H.G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds, a classic work of literature now in the public domain. Download this eBook to your eReader or borrow a print copy.

Friday Night Feature - 'Brooklyn Castle'

We will screen BROOKLYN CASTLE Friday, August 2nd.
We will screen BROOKLYN CASTLE Friday, August 2nd.

Friday, August 2 at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.Brooklyn Castle (2012) Documentary Feature; Rated PG; 102 minutes.

This documentary tells the stories of five members of the chess team at a below-the-poverty-line inner city junior high school that has won more national championships than any other in the country. The film follows the challenges these kids face in their personal lives as well as on the chessboard, and is as much about the sting of their losses as it is about the anticipation of their victories.

"Enlightening, inspiring and expertly crafted." -- Stephanie Merry, Washington Post

For more information, please watch the film's trailer. Check out our Friday Night Features in August.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs available on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen's).

Video of Christina Pugh

On Wednesday, May 29, 2013, local poet, Christina Pugh visited Darien Library to discuss her new collection of poemes, "Grains of the Voice."

For more information, please visit the original post.

Our Fall Book Discussion Series Continues

Colum McCann's TRANSATLANTIC
Colum McCann's TRANSATLANTIC

Transatlantic by Colum McCann

Wednesday, October 30 at 7 p.m.

Newfoundland, 1919. Two aviators—Jack Alcock and Arthur Brown—set course for Ireland as they attempt the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean, placing their trust in a modified bomber to heal the wounds of the Great War. Dublin, 1845 and ’46. On an international lecture tour in support of his subversive autobiography, Frederick Douglass finds the Irish people sympathetic to the abolitionist cause—despite the fact that, as famine ravages the countryside, the poor suffer from hardships that are astonishing even to an American slave.

New York, 1998. Leaving behind a young wife and newborn child, Senator George Mitchell departs for Belfast, where it has fallen to him, the son of an Irish-American father and a Lebanese mother, to shepherd Northern Ireland’s notoriously bitter and volatile peace talks to an uncertain conclusion. These three iconic crossings are connected by a series of remarkable women whose personal stories are caught up in the swells of history.

Praise for Transatlantic

“This novel is beautifully hypnotic in its movements, from the grand (between two continents, across three centuries) to the most subtle. Silkily threading together public events and private feelings, TransAtlantic says no to death with every line. Those who can’t see the point of historical novels will find their answer here: in all intelligent fiction, the past has not passed.”—Emma Donoghue, author of Room

Library staff members will lead the discussions.

We have copies of the books available for patrons to borrow, but prior reading of the books is not necessary to attend the discussions.

Additional parking for evening and weekend Library programs on Thorndal Circle (behind Nielsen’s).

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