You Are What You Read

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You Are What You Read!

It was such a dreary week, wasn’t it?  We have been so spoiled that when a bit of rain does happen to fall it befuddles us.  I did have a patron say to me that she had been craving weather such as this so that she had an excuse to hole up and read.  I for one never felt the need for excuses but, hey, if that makes you feel better have at it.   It looks like a nice weekend is in store and really isn’t that what we hope for anyway?  This week we have wisdom, a spy, some hype, PTSD and a new favorite. Of course there is a playlist. Of course! 


Let us begin!


Abby is back to reading one of her favorites. “When I finished Louise Penny’s 9th Chief Inspector Gamache novel last year I wondered where she would take the series. Her latest, The Long Way Home while a satisfying read, leaves me with the same question: what’s next? Newly retired Armand Gamache and his wife have set up house in Three Pines, the serene village outside of Montreal too small and hidden to appear on maps. Gamache gets drawn into helping one of his neighbors locate a missing person. While the mystery piece is not strong here, Penny continues to go deeper into the lives of her characters granting them a lovely mix of vulnerabilities, strengths, and quirks. The emphasis here is on how even the strong must tend to themselves and the wisdom we can all take away from the four things Gamache teaches new officers to express: I was wrong, I'm sorry, I don't know, I need help. “


Sweet Ann has just finished Red Joan by Jennie Rooney.  “This is quite an engaging spy novel based on a true story of an eighty-seven-year-old British woman arrested as the longest KGB spy in Great Britain's history.  Joan, the main character, is a brilliant young woman who in the late 1930's is studying science at Cambridge.  Her life is that of a typical student until Sonya, a Russian student, enters her life.  She introduces Joan to her cousin Leo who will introduce Joan to the world of espionage.  Joan is quite reluctant at first to get involved but circumstances change. The story alternates between Joan as an elderly woman being questioned by M15 and her days at college working for the British government during the beginning of World War ll.  This is an intriguing read about the choices people make and the reasons for doing so.  I thought it was well written although perhaps a little bit long.”


The Tall Cool Texan Virginia has just finished one of my favorites of the year.  What did you think VA?  “Believe the hype about Jane Smiley’s newest book, Some Luck, because it deserves all of the praise and accolades it has been receiving.  This epic saga tells the story of Iowan farmers, Rosanna and Walter Langdon, and their children over a 30 year time period, starting in the 1920s.  Each chapter represents a new year in their lives and is told from the perspective of different family members.  Smiley does a masterful job of creating the personalities of each character and giving the reader an intimate look at their unique realities, from the highs and to the lows.  Nothing is spared. While reading Some Luck, I am not sure if I felt more like a fly on the wall or a distant cousin, but all I know is by the end of the book I cared about the Langdon family and wanted to know where the next 30 years would take each of them. Luckily, Smiley has planned this as a trilogy so we can expect to see more of the Langdon family.“


Steph is here and she has taken to heart a patron recommendation.  I’ll let her tell you all about it. “Over the weekend, I read A Test of Wills, by Charles Todd, after a book group read it and highly recommended it. This is the first of sixteen books in the Inspector Ian Rutledge series, a detective mystery series set in Britain after the First World War. In this book, Rutledge is still suffering from what we would now call PTSD, which he experiences primarily as a voice in his head, of a young man who he sentenced to death during the war. He rejoins Scotland Yard after coming home, and is sent to the countryside to investigate a politically sensitive murder in a town where nobody wants to talk to him. He’s plunged into several small town dramas and, having no one to trust, tries to solve the crime alone. It’s not a book with a lot of twists, but it definitely kept me guessing right up until the end. The book rotates through several points of view, but really focuses on Rutledge’s, giving it the same feel as a Tana French or Denise Mina novel. It’s a great series for fans of those writers, or any reader who likes the combination of a detective’s psychology and a well-plotted mystery. I can’t wait to read more books in this series!


Now that the night comes on faster and the weather has turned cooler, I can be found back playing in my kitchen which most of you know makes me happy.  This time of year brings out the nesting instinct in us all I think.  My latest companion in the kitchen is One Pot: 120+ Easy Meals from Your Skillet, Slow Cooker, Stockpot, and More by the Editors of Martha Stewart Living.  The conceit here is that you can make your dinner in one pot, be that pot a Dutch oven, a sheet pan, or a slow cooker. The chapters are dedicated to whatever vessel you choose to be using and there are some really great recipes in here.  So far the favorites are salmon roasted with kale and cabbage and dressed in a lemon vinaigrette, and sausages and potatoes braised in ale.  The other thing I love about this book is that it takes one basic recipe and changes it up 4 different ways.  I can totally see this as a wedding gift with one or more of the pots alongside. Make sure you grab a copy for yourself!


DJ Jazzy Patty McC is here from The State That Shall Not Be Named (35 days until The Game!) and she has some questions for us.  What’s good Pats?  “Are we what we read? That seems to be the thesis of this weekly missive. But an interesting debate has once again emerged. This dialogue always fascinates me, and finds me swimming right into the deep end of this meta-discussion. The debate is about reading, specifically the types of books children should be allowed to or encouraged to read.   There are two camps in this debate. The ‘just so long as they’re reading’ camp versus the ‘from pulp to Proust? No way, start them with real literature and classics’ camp. I would like to offer another version. While there may be some truth to You Are What You Read, it is far too reductive and simplistic. Aren’t we more complex than that?   Take, for example, my seven-year-old son who frequented the reference desk asking for books on fighter planes, as he had already read all the books on planes in the Children’s Library. His interest that began with planes led him naturally to want more complex texts as he desired more knowledge. As a culture we get anxious when it comes to our children and reading. There exists anxiousness that, as parents, if we don’t give our children the right kind of books they will somehow be deficient. My daughter is a voracious reader and my son is well on his way. I trust that their love of stories and what’s going to happen next will serve them well and that they will go on to read difficult texts with complex storylines.   As adults don’t we sometimes need a little light reading to break up an otherwise steady stream of serious novels or non-fiction? Does anyone exclusively read serious literature 24-7? What is wrong with a slice of pulp fiction or a light-hearted beach book with a side of romance or danger? I say, nothing.  After all, We Are What We Read…DL WHY ARE YOU WHAT YOU READ? 2014

You Are What You Read!

Another week of not very good news I am afraid.  There’s sickness, bad behavior everywhere, the Market is tanking.  Everyone’s mood seems to veering somewhere between hysteria and a shoulder shrugging fatalism.  I know that for myself my nerves are frayed and I found myself asking a woman who cut in front of me in a line if she was aware of how rude she was being.  And just to let you all know, she didn’t care.  Look, it’s not pretty People.  We are supposed to have a lovely weekend with a partly sunny day tomorrow and highs in the 70’s with Sunday also being partly sunny but with slightly chillier temps.  I am charging all of you to do something that brings you peace and happiness.  So bake a cookie, go for a walk by the sea, play with a puppy, have lunch with a friend, go to The Marshalls.  Do one thing so that for the next week you can look back on it and remember with fondness and perhaps bring a little tranquility to your world. This week we have secrets (ssshhh), Old Boys, bodies of water, an island, a muddle and a vow.  Playlist?  Another twofer week!  Bonus! 

Let us begin!

Barbara M told me she was pleasantly surprised at how much she enjoyed her offering this week. “Not My Father’s Son by actor and now author Alan Cumming is a heart wrenching, beautifully written memoir. The book is organized into alternating chapters entitled ‘Then’ and ‘Now.’ The ‘Then’ chapters focus on the abuse Cumming and his brother suffered from their father. The ‘Now’ chapters tell the story of the filming of the BBC show Who Do You Think You Are which uses genealogical research to uncover family secrets. The subject they chose to investigate was the disappearance of Cumming’s maternal grandfather who never returned home after serving in France during World War II. He eventually moved to Malaysia and died there under mysterious circumstances. The book is poignant, sometimes funny and very engrossing. “

Erin as we all know, loves herself a memoir.  Here is her take on Lena Dunham’s Not that Kind of Girl. “The creator/writer/star of HBO’s Girls has written a highly entertaining collection of personal essays on the topics of falling in love, losing her virginity, accepting her body, and sitting at the table of the Old Boys Club that is Hollywood. While Dunham can be very polarizing, I found her essays to be well written and frequently hilarious. She is, after all, sharing her own experience as a young woman coming into her own.”

Laura is hanging on to summer.   Here are two books that have stuck with her. “I wanted to let you know of some special reading that I did over the summer that I think many would enjoy.  These books are not new, but both are perspectives on our region, Long Island Sound and the Hudson River Valley, that will make you want to explore and know more about these amazing waterways.  First is The Hudson, A History, by Tom Lewis.  What I didn't know was the Hudson River was the engine behind the development of our country. Albany was the most important city during the 1800's, and when Lincoln was campaigning for President, Albany was the place he needed the votes, because industry and westward expansion was at its utmost. Not only were artists mesmerized by the river's landscape and beauty; industrialists and inventors were captured by its potential which, in turn, fueled the emerging region into the powerhouse it still is today.  As well, the story about Long Island Sound is beautifully rendered in Tom Andersen's This Fine Piece of Water: An Environmental History of Long Island Sound.  From the Indians, to pirates, to the colonies fighting for independence, to the present day city expansions and pollution; this is the story about how the Sound is coming back thanks to the efforts of environmental watch groups.  It is a strongly written account of the history of our failures and our successes.  This is a must read.”

The Ever Delightful Pat S has just finished The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin. “ This is a charming tale which reads almost as a fable and  yet is not a fable. So I have settled on it being a sort of love letter to readers. Set in an independent bookstore on an island off the coast of Massachusetts, we are introduced to a childless middle aged widower. In the two years since his wife died, A. J. has become angry and bitter due to his personal loss and as a bookseller in a failing business. Lo and behold, something completely unexpected is dropped into his lap-providing the catalyst for a new and wonderful life. Peopled with the local denizens of an island colony, it is reading that ties everyone together at first until the bonds of love and friendship have become established. Each chapter is introduced with a synopsis of a book or short story which mirrors A.J. Fikry’s life philosophy and provides a very respectable reading list for the reader as well. This is a book which celebrates the power of reading and art to heal and nurture. If the news is getting you down, this is the book for you.”


Steph has discovered another favorite of the year. “Here is another best book of the year;  On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss. Biss, who has won practically every award you can win for essay and non-fiction writing, has produced one of the most thoughtful pieces of personal writing I have read in a long time. When she became pregnant with her son, Biss was instantly confronted by the many dilemmas facing modern mothers, and none was more urgent and muddled than the decision to vaccinate. Should she vaccinate? When? Which diseases? This puzzle led her to research the history of vaccination and how it’s been regarded over the years. The result is a book that moves effortlessly between personal story and well-researched non-fiction. The book is relatively short, but Biss’s writing is so powerful that I often took breaks while reading it to absorb everything she’d thrown at me. This book would obviously be great for parents, doctors, and nurses, but will also appeal to readers who like Andrew Solomon, Rachel Carson, and Carolyn Kellogg. This is essay writing and science writing at its finest.”

The Fabulous Babs B saw the play of one of my favorite movies of all time.  She is begging us all to take a train into New York and experience for ourselves.  Here is what she thought of You Can't Take It With You by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman.  “On Wednesday a dear friend took me to see the play You Can't Take It With You, with the great James Earl Jones.  Set in New York City 1936 it's the story of the zany Sycamore family who march to the beat of a different drummer!  When the young Miss Sycamore falls in love and meets her fiancée’s parents who are extremely cold and worlds apart from her loving family, she cancels her engagement.  Her Grandfather (James Earl Jones) will have none of this however, and proceeds to tell her how lucky she is to have found love and to go for it because you can't take it with you and life is too short not to take a shot at being happy.  The moral of this story really hit home with me and I intend to seize the moment and do things in life I want.  Remember, you can't take it with you!”

DJ Jazzy Patty McC is here from The State Which Shall Not Be Named (BTW 42 days until The Game).  She is working on focusing on What’s Good.  So Pats?  What’s Good?  “ This week I’d like to focus on The Happy. What makes me happy is probably different than what makes you happy so I’ll share first.  This week it made me very happy to hear that folks are enthusiastically lining up to get their flu shots. It makes me feel as though my endless preaching has been heard, so thank you for that! And for those who have not yet done so, please go get a flu shot.

It’s no secret that I am a picture book enthusiast. So it made me very happy to learn that one of my favorite authors has a new picture book, Once Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories for All the Letters by Oliver Jeffers. I’m lucky number three in the hold queue and will be anxiously awaiting that pick-up email. I’ve no doubt that this book will meet my expectations. In fact, the anticipation of reading it makes me happy and frankly just a tiny bit giddy. Read more about it here.

Discovering good new tunes also makes me happy. This week I’ve curated a short playlist with some new songs that you may not have heard though I’m fairly certain you’ve heard the first tune. DL A SHORT PLAYLIST OF NEW TUNES 2014

I’m also including a throwback to the  DL SUMMER FIND UR HAPPY PLACE 2013  playlist because it’s just plain chock-full of happy. I recommend you listen to it in the shuffle mode.

If you find that you need some help in finding your own Happy, I’ve got good news. There’s an app for that! Check these out.

So this week I encourage you to go forth, find your own Happy and share it with us. The world could use a little more Happy right about now.

New DVD Releases

Here is what you can find new to the shelves in the upcoming days.

What are my neighbors up to?

Here is a list of the most popular items this week.

You Are What You Read!

I need to begin this week with an apology.  Apparently I caused some marital discord because I stated the Harvest Moon would take place on Monday when, in fact, it occurred on Wednesday.  So my apologies to Curtiss R, I regret to inform you that Leslie was right and I was wrong.  As for the rest of you, I hope that your gleaning/threshing activities were in no way inconvenienced.  But it was a really pretty moon, wasn’t it?  (Hangs head in shame, shuffles away and changes the subject) As you can see, the message from The SoNo Loft this week is Tell the Story.  Who doesn’t love a good story? Good stories enlighten, entertain and stay with you.  On Wednesday (and yes I double checked that), the National Book Award committee will be announcing the short list for fiction and I am praying that my two favorites, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr and Some Luck by Jane Smiley will be among the five chosen.  Both of these are amazing stories and they are populated by wonderfully rich characters.  And with the way the world has been lately, who wouldn’t want to lose themselves in a wonderful story?  I for one have this weekend off, no OSU Football to occupy me and I am looking forward to a big stack of book to lose myself in. I hope you have a similar stack.  If not, we can help you with that and you know where to find us. This week we have voices, a really questionable romance, letters, life choices, sad discoveries, and a wave. And the Playlist!  This week times two!


Let us begin!


Sue S has a new romance novel that she is rabid for. “Let’s face it, it’s a fact, heroes are my weakness. It's also a fact that for this week’s You Are What You Read it is the title of the book I devoured in 2 evenings. Heroes Are My Weakness by Susan Elizabeth Phillips is the story of a young woman, a down-on-her-luck ventriloquist, who has to stay 60 consecutive days on an island in a cottage once owned by her deceased mother or risk losing it.  She comes to find that a reclusive writer, Theo Harp, who writes chilling horror novels, is also staying on the island. Annie and Theo (who I found to be as broody as Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights) have a past and now they're trapped together on a snowy island off the coast of Maine. Annie’s inner voice and those of her puppets is warning her that Theo is trouble and that she should stay way. But it’s Annie's heart that is the real trouble maker when it starts telling her he has changed. Only time will tell who Annie should really listen to! This book will definitely get rid of the chill on a cold day!”


Amanda is heating up her fall with the sizzling new eBook, A Good Debutante’s Guide to Ruin by Sophie Jordan. “This book first comes with a warning: the lovers are stepsiblings. However, as shocking as this may be to us, fans of historical romance know that stepsibling romance is only unseemly and not all that bad. The hero, Decian, was thrown out of his home 10 years ago. His stepsister, Rosalie, was sent away to school and left there. Now Decian’s father is dead and Rosalie has been unceremoniously dropped on his doorstep after overstaying her welcome at school. Will Decian be able to forgive Rosalie the sin of being her mother’s daughter? And to what lengths will Rosalie go to discover herself before being forced into marriage with a stranger? This book is a marvelous quick read and one of the most scandalous things I’ve ever read. I can’t wait to read the next book in the series which alas – has not been announced yet.”

Pat T has taken a suggestion to heart this week. “A patron suggested I read Dear Committee Members by Julie Schumacher. She said, ‘I know you don't like epistolary style books, but I promise this book is laugh out loud funny.’  And she's right! Jason Fitger is a creative writing professor at a small Midwest college and he is always called upon by the students to write letters of recommendation on their behalf.  Jason's once promising writing career is in a downward spiral, he wreaked havoc on his personal life by disclosing his private affairs in his novels and he is in rivalries with the other college departments because they are better funded. This and more is detailed in this hilarious, clever and passive aggressive letters of recommendation. Sit down, put your feet up and enjoy this humorous read!”

Sweet Ann has just finished The Children Act by Ian McEwan.  “This short read kept me engaged from the first page to the last.  Judge Fiona Maye presides over family cases that are heart wrenching. The novel centers on the case of an eighteen year old boy who is a Jehovah's Witness and needs a blood transfusion to survive his cancer.  The boy is strong in his beliefs and he and Fiona form quite a bond after she visits him in the hospital to help her determine her decision.  Fiona is also having marital trouble.  Is she too involved in her work or just dealing with her inability to ever have children?  This novel makes you think about life choices we all have to make.  It also makes you question how involved one should get in someone else's life.  It is a great read and I also loved the novel Saturday by Mr. McEwan.”

Steph has another book to add to the Favorites of 2014 List! “After hearing so much about it online and from fellow readers in the Library, I was glad to finally get a chance to read Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng. The novel opens with a disappearance, and then a sad discovery: Lydia Lee has drowned in the lake in her small town in Ohio. Her family is devastated, because not only was her death unexpected, but it has also unveiled many family secrets. The book skips from mind to mind and from past to present as the mystery unfolds. The revelations of the story, while quiet and small, are devastating. Ng captures so beautifully (her writing is exquisite) the ways families hurt each other, even, and especially, out of love. My heart ached for every character. This is one of my favorite books of 2014.”

Virginia the Tall Cool Texan is here this week and she’s revisiting one of her obsessions. “This week I return with my love of YA dystopian novels.  My newest obsession is Hugh Yancey’s The Infinite Sea, the second installment in The Fifth Wave trilogy.  Warning, you really need to read The Fifth Wave first, because this one picks up almost immediately where it left off.  I have been anxiously waiting for this book to come out for months and it did not disappoint.  Just like the first book, the story is told through different perspectives as the characters try to survive as they prepare to battle the fifth and final wave.  Yancey does an excellent job of enriching the story with character flashbacks and, while I was somewhat disappointed one of the storylines took a backseat, by the end I had a better appreciation for some of the other characters. The book was action-packed but it also displayed a rare vulnerability with its character development.  While many of the questions from the first book are answered, other mysteries arise, and by the end, Yancey has set himself up for an epic showdown for the final book.  This is a series that cannot be missed.  Think Hunger Games meets the X-Files meets the Body Snatchers.  My only complaint is now I have to wait another year for the third and final installment of the series. “

DJ Jazzy Patty McC is here from The State Up North (49 days until The Game.  Get excited!) and as you can see she is back to herself again.  Here’s what she’s thinking about this week. “Is anyone else suffering from media overload? It seems that every news outlet is more focused on producing hysteria than reporting facts. There are a lot of things to worry over. Trust me, I could create an exhaustive list that would leave you in a sweaty ball of anxiety, require heavy medication and a team of specialists to get you out of the house again.   I refuse to be another voice of hysteria. Instead, I’d like to suggest that we all take three deep breaths and don’t freak out. There are a few things we can do right now to alleviate some of this craziness: 

1) Get a flu shot (I know, I sound like a broken record)  
2) Make sure your children’s immunizations are current and get them a flu shot (Needle stuck in the groove)
3) If your child is sick, keep him or her home from school. (Yes, this one is tough for working parents especially if you have a child who is ill for a long time. My third grader was out for eight days straight from school already. I feel your pain.)

If you still find yourself still freaking out, put the newspaper away, step away from the glowing screen, get outside and go for a long walk in nature. Hard data proves that this simple step reduces anxiety.”
DL TELL THE STORY 2014 & DL Don't Freak Out 2013

You Are What You Read!

The Loft’s message remains the same; ‘Leaf on the Wind’ and I still don’t get it. If anyone out there is feeling the message, please report back.  On Monday we have the Harvest Moon to look forward to.  This full moon is thusly named because it is the full moon nearest the autumnal equinox and is typically bright enough to allow the finishing of harvest chores after the sun goes down. So those of you with some last minute threshing to take care of will have light from the moon to get that done. Enjoy! Of course this also means that we are in the thick of the fall season and I suppose I should do something this weekend to celebrate that fact.  Perhaps an apple pie would make me feel better about this?  Or a lovely savory something made with butternut squash?  I did sneak in a white pants wearing last weekend because the weather was cooperating but even I have to concede defeat and declare that there will be no more white pants now until May 26, 2015.  Mark the calendar.  I am however still clinging stubbornly to the bare leg but honestly if the mornings continue to run cool as they have been that will be the next thing to go.   This week we have some dystopia, Paris, a team of women, Italy, drinking, grey cells and bodies. A whole town full of dead bodies.   Playlist?  You betcha!


Let us begin!


Miss Elisabeth of the CL is doing a reversal this week.  I’ll let her explain. Miss Elisabeth? “On Saturday I went to see The Maze Runner. It was great! I'd never read the book, so I went in completely blind, and I found the action-packed plot thrilling. The ending of the movie was a bit of a mess; the explanation for the Maze didn't make too much sense, but I assume that's because I didn't read the book. The cast was excellent. Thomas Brodie-Sangster, who stole everyone's hearts as the adorable Sam in Love, Actually was one of the main characters, and he looks exactly the same! The lead character was played by Dylan O'Brien, who is very, very funny as sidekick Stiles on MTV's Teen Wolf. The whole cast was really pleasantly diverse and they did a great job with the material, elevating what could have been another run-of-the-mill dystopian movie into something really fun to watch. I just checked the book out today, and I look forward to figuring out what the heck was going on in the last ten minutes of the movie!”


Barbara M. Back in Paris.  As it should be.  “On the advice of one of my favorite patrons I’m reading Sacré Bleu a whimsical, comedic, absurd novel by Christopher Moore. It’s about van Gogh’s death, the color blue and the art world in Paris during the late 1800s. The cast of characters includes not only well known artists such as Toulouse-Lautrec, Monet, Gaugin and Manet but also a mystical being called The Colorman who roams around trying to sell his special blue paint to artists. The book is a mixture of genres (historical-fiction, fantasy, satire) and is very funny. Although it is not my usual type of book I’m thoroughly enjoying it.”


Laura is surprised this week. “Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer was a satisfying surprise.  Set in an everyday world, a team of four women, a biologist, a surveyor, an anthropologist and a psychiatrist set out to study Area X, a part of the world that has evolved in a different way.  The scene is not necessarily post-apocolyptic and it could be taking place in the present day.  The story's point of view is through the eyes and mind of the biologist as she studies and gathers data.  There is very little dialog but the inquisitiveness of the biologist keeps you reading.  It is a slow burn kind of read that when you pick it up to, you are rewarded with a steady and even handed drama.  Annihilation is Book One of the South Reach Trilogy and I am looking forward to reading Book 2, Authority, in the future.

Babs B has finished The Secret of Raven Point by Jennifer Vanderbes.  “When her adored older brother goes missing in Italy during WWII, Julie signs up to be an Army nurse.  When she finds herself assigned to the front lines, her once sheltered life changes dramatically.  Her only thought in the beginning was finding her brother, but as the weeks turn into months and she befriends patients, makes new friends, and her whole life opens up.  While reading this story I honestly felt transported to another time and place.  I had a great time with this book!”

The Always Delightful Pat S has just read A Spy Among Friends by Ben McIntyre.  “If you are a 007 fan, this book is going to be a myth buster. Kim Philby, perhaps the greatest double agent of the 20th century, was working for the Soviets while he had a long and high profile position in MI6. This allowed him to infiltrate not just the center of British security but American security as well.  McIntyre tells the story of his entrance into the spy world; a seamless transition from the storied world of Cambridge to MI6 where he joined a select and class-conscious few. Predicated on nothing more substantial than knowing the right people, Philby embarked on a career which was ably assisted by his charm, sociability and prodigious drinking habits. In fact, it was Philby’s very sociability which allowed him access to inner circles the world over. When the charade ultimately came to an end in 1963, and Philby defected to Moscow, neither his best friends from Cambridge, fellow spies, nor any one of his three wives had any clue as to his duplicity. This is a fascinating look at a world where the myths are less improbable than the reality.”


Steph is visiting with an old friend in a new way. “It was with some trepidation that I approached The Monogram Murders, by Sophie Hannah. You might not know that this book is by Sophie Hannah if you looked at the cover quickly, because another author’s name is MUCH bigger on it: AGATHA CHRISTIE. That’s right: this is a new Hercule Poirot story, the first since Curtain was published in 1975! It’s always a little scary when someone gets a new crack at a favorite like Poirot, but knowing that she had the full backing of the Christie estate, I tried it out. The result? Quite fun! No, it’s not the Agatha Christie you remember. But the plot is a delightfully Christie-like maze, and more importantly, Poirot sounds exactly like he should. This was very enjoyable and certainly worth the attention of your little grey cells.


I am WILD for The Undertaker’s Daughter by Kate Mayfield. Kate grew up in sleepy, segregated Jubilee Kentucky.  Grief brings out the best and the worst in people and as the daughter of the town’s undertaker, Kate saw it all.  I recently described it to a co-worker as To Kill a Mockingbird with dead bodies, and a soupçon of mental illness with a side of alcoholism and infidelity. Mayfield is a wonderfully evocative writer who describes her unusual upbringing and her hometown with love and tenderness even while she is conjuring up painful reminiscences.  How much do I love this book?  I am reading it on my Kindle for my commute and in book form the minute I get home.  I am planning what will be for dinner to optimize evening reading time.  This gem is due out in January and be glad of it because the Hellidays would probably be a diminished affair if you got your hands on it in December.


DJ Jazzy Patty McC is still battling a vicious something in the State Up North. Join me in wishing her recovery.  It would appear we are too late to wish her the speedy part.  “Last weekend my family and I wrapped up Banned Books Week by venturing out to celebrate a nighttime festival of art and light in downtown Detroit. The Exhibition DLECTRICITY  featured over 35 world-renowned and emerging artists whose work lit up the city in brilliant color and movement. Art galleries, studios and cathedrals were open for art projected on their walls both inside and out creating an art display unlike any other. Kids were outside playing Minecraft and their games were successively projected on one side of the Detroit Institute of Arts. There was even a parade, a light bike parade! The Mindfield video projection on the Detroit Institute of Arts and across the street on the Detroit Public Library was mind blowing. So this week, I thought it would be worthwhile to celebrate and listen to an artist who is no stranger to the threat of censure or banning. This week listen to a musical genius and artist who just released not one but two albums! This week I bring you the MAN in PURPLE otherwise known as Prince. Enjoy the tunes.”

DL WHAT COLOR IS GENIUS? 2014

You Are What You Read!

We begin this week with a shout of thanks to Sandy and Jim D for the beautiful floral tribute. No need to apologize that it wasn't taffy or fudge!  Just seeing that lovely arrangement can make one forget all about taffy and fudge!   We thank you and so do our pants!  While I continue to bemoan the fact that summer has left us, The SoNo Loft has moved on and is celebrating the change of season with the message of ‘Leaf on the Wind’. What this means is anyone’s guess.  This week we have Rock & Roll, some potential frustration, Dublin, a power couple, Detroit, New York City, and  some love. Playlist?  Of course!

Let us begin!

Abby has just finished watching 20 Feet From Stardom.  “This is a case of better late than never. I finally watched the Academy Award winning documentary 20 Feet From Stardom. The film introduces us to the voices we grew up listening to and singing along with but we never knew the people behind them. The storytelling is helped along by some of the biggest stars in Rock & Roll who share their appreciation for the backup singers who add layers of complexity and feeling to their work.  One of the highlights for me was learning the story of Merry Clayton, the woman who sang the haunting background on the Rolling Stones hit Gimme Shelter.  Watching Merry sit in the studio listening to a playback of her part is a wonder. I already knew some of Darlene Love’s story. Learning how her career as a solo artist was sabotaged was heartbreaking but her realization that she was meant to sing reclaimed her career. As one of the singers said, when people sing along, they sing OUR parts.  Get ready to get some great music stuck in your head.”

John is looking forward to starting something new.   “I have started a behemoth of a fantasy series The Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson.  I may have set myself up for frustration, however, because with only two of ten planned books written, I’m going to have a hard time sitting on my hands, waiting for the next installment (due sometime in 2015).  The first book, The Way of Kings weighs in at 1007 pages, but the story is so immersive that the time goes by quickly.  I’m on to the second book now, Words of Radiance which, at 1087 pages, is no less captivating.  Sanderson is a master world-builder, and while Game of Thrones fans will undoubtedly think his writing significantly less gritty than they are used to, they may find the pace and storyline compelling enough to break into this series.”

Sweet Ann loves The Secret Place by Tana French.  “This is the fifth novel by Ms. French concerning crimes that the Dublin Murder Squad tries to solve.  Her writing is wonderful and her descriptions transport you to the locales she mentions, whether it is the grittiness of the squad room, or the lush beautiful grounds of a girls' school.  This story tells about the death of a sixteen-year-old student at the nearby boys' school whose bludgeoned body was discovered on the grounds of a girls' school.  The murder occurred a year ago and there has been no progress on the case until a picture of the victim appears with the words ‘I know who killed him’ written on it. The Secret Place is another great mystery by Tana French.”

Pat T is keeping her latest obsession alive. “Last week many of us watched the highly acclaimed PBS TV series The Roosevelt's: an Intimate History. Now that it is over, I am going through withdrawal, so I decided to listen to the audio book Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage by Hazel Rowley and narrated by one of my favorite narrators, Tavia Gilbert. Just like the Kennedy's and the Clinton's, there has been much speculation about the Roosevelt's marriage, and the author gives us a glimpse into the Roosevelt's unconventional marriage. These two people created a partnership according to their own ambitions and needs, yet at the same time supporting and encouraging one another. Hazel Rowley refers to Eleanor Roosevelt's biography, This Is My Story, so I will add this book to my reading pile too!”

Miss Elisabeth of the CL did some very adult reading with the latest by Lauren Beukes.  “I enjoyed reading Broken Monsters but I wouldn’t ever read it again! It’s a very, very dark book. It starts out as a crime thriller: Detroit Homicide Detective Gabriella Versado has caught a particularly gruesome case. A young boy was murdered, cut in half, attached to the bottom of a fawn, and then left in an abandoned tunnel. Soon another body, also horribly disfigured, is found. As Verdosa begins to piece together the madness behind the crimes, we also follow the stories of a failed reporter newly arrived in Detroit, Verdosa’s 15-year-old daughter, Layla and her tragic best friend Cass, a reformed criminal named TK, and an artist named Clayton at the end of his rope. The stories begin to come together with the introduction of a seriously disturbing supernatural element. The writing is beautiful, and the author, who is South African, speaks with surprising authority on the decay of Detroit. Still, the end is SO CREEPY. Shudders all around.”


Virginia the Tall Cool Texan is back this week!  What up VA?  “This week, I got my greedy little hands on an advanced copy of the sequel to one of my favorite books of all time, The Rosie Project. Author Graeme Simsion brings back Don Tillman in all of his pathologically, micro-managed, organized glory.  In The Rosie Effect, Don and Rosie are newly married and have left Australia to live in New York. Just as they are adjusting to being newlyweds, (Don has created a schedule and menu to his liking), they find out Rosie is pregnant. This is where the book falls off course for me. The natural assumption would be for Simsion to focus on Don and Rosie’s relationship and how they adjust to the idea of being pregnant and becoming parents.  However, Rosie’s character fades to the background, and Simsion chooses to focus on Don, his conflicting emotions about the pregnancy and his growing relationship with his buddies. In fact, in a lot of ways, this book is more of a bromance than a romance.  This was unfortunate, because I found the magic of The Rosie Project to be the important dynamic between Rosie and Don. She provided a good balance to him, making the reader see his personality quirks as more lovable than annoying. Let’s just say in The Rosie Effect, you don’t have the luxury of this buffer. As with most sequels, I didn’t find The Rosie Effect to have the same charm as the original but it was still an enjoyable read.


Thomas S aka My Son is here and is celebrating his freedom to read whatever he pleases.  Makes a Mom proud actually, or at least this Mom.  “In August of 1998, the recently reunited mid-western emo band Mineral released their single, &Serenading on Crank! Records. The b-side of that single was a totally awesome cover of a song by the band, The Psychedelic Furs. In my own honest opinion, this cover of Love My Way is vastly superior to the original version. You can judge for yourself by clicking here. Continuing the theme of loving your own way, and in honor of Banned Book Week, I have decided to talk about Nancy Garden's Annie on My Mind. First published in July of 1982, this book is groundbreaking because it was really the first novel to explore these themes in a positive light, as opposed to the majority of LGBTQ subjects that were being presented negatively in pulp novels. I will admit, some elements of the story are a bit dated, but that should help paint a clearer picture for the reader as to how important this work of fiction truly was. This book broke all the rules set for presenting homosexual characters.  I guarantee that anyone who reads this will walk away thinking about how beautifully the romance was  presented. I think it's this reason that the book was banned in the first place. If you choose to pick this up, remember that you don't know everyone around you 100%, and it's this reason that you should never condemn something that makes someone else happy and doesn't harm the people around them.”

DJ Jazzy Patty Mcc is back this week and feeling much better thank you.  Here’s what she musing about.  “A new season is here that brings us gourds-a-plenty, DIY apple picking, hayrides, apple cider, doughnuts and hours spent wandering lost in giant corn mazes. The cooler temperatures, the new light that filters everything with a soft glow, the changing colors of the leaves all signal a sweet gradual change that will gently ease us into the slumber of winter. We’ve enjoyed some really lovely weather here in my fine state and I’m happy to report everyone is well again. So this week I invite you all to curl up with a book, a steaming mug of something yummy and relish your freedom to read what you want when you want. I can guarantee that this prescription is sure to cure all ills. “

DL LISTEN TO THE BAND 2014

 

You Are What You Read!

To start this week, we give a shout out to Amy C, True Library Friend and our Beloved Board President, who brought us caramels from the spot where she Summers in Montana!  They were EPIC and worth every calorie.  Thanks AmyI have come to the sad realization that I can fight the March of Autumn only so long before even I have to surrender.  The Autumnal Equinox arrives on Monday at 10:29; so officially this is the last weekend for the Summer of 2014. A more beautiful summer I don’t think I have ever seen.  I don’t know about you all but I marvel at how swiftly fall is taking over.  The golden quality of sunlight, the way it’s  getting darker earlier, that bite in the morning air, even the green of the leaves is starting to have that muted characteristic of impending change.  At the Farmer’s Market this week there were still beautiful tomatoes and corn to be had, but there were also plenty of fall squashes, pumpkins, mums, newly dug potatoes, lovely crisp apples and pears. This morning on the train platform I was in the minority with my sleeveless dress and bare leg.  All around me were tweeds and boots and sweaters.  They looked much more comfortable than I felt. So I officially yield to fall and I wish it a long glorious reign because just the thought of winter returning is killing me.  This week we have knife throwing, Queens, (but not Knife Throwing Queens. Sorry), Wonder Woman, some Grand Duchesses, London, The Street and a Boston Girl. You want a soundtrack with all that?  Done!  In fact we are giving you two!

Let us begin!

Miss Elisabeth of the CL is still talking about what she did while Away.  “While I was on vacation, I read 6 adult books, mostly light beach reads and detective thrillers. By far the best one was a brand new book by Chelsea Cain, One Kick. The beginning of a new mystery series, this was a nail-biting suspense novel with the type of heroine you can’t help but root for. When she was six, Kick Lannigan was kidnapped from her front yard.  When she was 11, Kick was accidently rescued by the FBI. Now she’s 21, and she’s spent the past ten years making sure she knows how to keep herself safe: martial arts, sharp shooting, knife throwing skills, and lock-picking are among her many talents. Her quiet, safe life is forever altered when she is drawn into the investigation of two recent child abductions with eerie similarities to her own. I literally could not put this book down. I read it on the plane, and was so engrossed in the story I didn’t notice we were landing until I felt the plane bump the ground! If you like suspenseful mysteries, One Kick is a great pick. “

Barbara M loves herself a Seriously Sad Story.  Here is her latest pick.  “When I started reading We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas I thought it would be an updated version of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, a family saga of the Irish-American experience. In a way, it is an immigrant American family saga but it is so much more. It’s about unfulfilled dreams and how the early onset of Alzheimer’s disease can devastate a family. The book is the beautifully written story of Eileen, a child of Irish immigrants, who has aspirations of escaping her life in Woodside, Queens. When she marries Ed Leary, a promising scientist, she believes that her life will go as she planned. It doesn’t. A sad story exquisitely told.”

Mallory has been talking non-stop about her love for this book.  Seriously.  She won’t stop. Please someone else read this so she can have a Book Friend.  Thank you.  For those of you who want a head start, check out Darien Reads.  “The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore is part biography, part feminist history, part comic legacy, and my new go-to recommendation, so get used to hearing me blab about it.  William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman’s creator, was a man obsessed with truth and justice, surrounded by women who were crusaders during the suffragist and birth control movements of the early 1900’s.  He gets a degree in law, gets a degree in psychology, invents the lie detector, and basically fails at everything he attempts.  Marston marries his high school sweetheart and then takes on a secret live-in wife as well (the feminist Queen Margaret Sanger’s niece).  He has children with each woman and they all live together as one glorious oddball family in a little town called Darien, CT for a short period of time.  Marston imbues Wonder Woman with characteristics from the women he encounters and uses her as a radical agent for social change.  Wonder Woman was powerful, political, and her only weakness was being shackled by man; Marston’s Wonder Woman is my new personal hero. He states, ‘Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who, I believe, should rule the world.’ You’ll find The Secret History of Wonder Woman when it comes out in October, so place your holds now!”

The Fabulous Babs B just finished a book we are pretty wild for, The Romanov Sisters by Helen Rappaport.  Here’s what she thinks.  “This is the history of the four daughters of the tsar of Russia, Nicholas II.  They were the Princess Diana of their day and were much admired for their happy dispositions, their looks, the clothes they wore and their privileged life style.  The girls lived in virtual isolation, their only freedom being when they traveled, usually on the Royal Yacht.  I found it sad that they were constantly surrounded by armed guards.  I also learned that Alexandra, the girl's mother, suffered with numerous health issues throughout her life which severely restricted her lifestyle.  I was drawn to the great love and devotion the Romanovs felt for each other, despite living through the harshest of circumstances. “

Pat S has just finished Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home by Nina Stibbe. “Back in the early 80's, Nina, a young dropout from rural England, decides to try her luck at being a nanny in London. She joins the bohemian household of single mom Mary Kay Wilmers (editor and owner of London Review of Books) and her sons Will and Sam Frears.   She finds herself in a rather rarefied literary world where one of the neighbors is the esteemed playwright Alan Bennett who drops in frequently for dinner, and the ex-husband is Stephen Frears the movie director. Nina does not recognize the names, nor is she impressed when told who they are. She is the anti-Mary Poppins (she neither cooks nor cleans), and fits in perfectly with this colorful, raffish crew. Over a period of the next several years, Nina recounts to her sister Victoria her daily routines and exchanges first as a nanny, and then as a returning university student in this enchanting, laugh out loud collection of letters.  After reading these delightful letters, it made me wonder what will become of the epistolary format now that no-one seems to write letters any longer.”

Here’s Steph and what she’s reading. “This weekend on my commute, I read Business Adventures by John Brooks. This is our selection for September’s Business Book Group, and came to most people’s attention after Bill Gates told an interviewer it was his favorite business book. To be honest, even though I usually like business books, I didn’t have high hopes for this one, because it seemed to be a bunch of random stories from twentieth-century Wall Street. I was so wrong! This book has been a delight. Brooks was a writer for The New Yorker, and each of these stories reads like the sort of article you cut out and pass along to a friend. Whether he’s explaining how a corner works (and what happened the last time someone tried to pull one off), or walking the reader through the growth of Xerox, his writing is funny and clear, and has something to offer both the business novice and the Wall Street expert. I’m really looking forward to discussing it on September 23.”

I must confess that I was not a huge fan of Anita Diamant’s book The Red Tent.  I have found that you either love this book, or you are in my camp:  Camp Pack-Up-Your-Tent-And-Go.  But when I heard her speak at a Library Preview at Simon and Schuster about her new book Boston Girl I was intrigued enough to give it a shot and I am glad I did.  Addie Baum is asked by her granddaughter the following question: “How did you get to be the woman you are today?”  Thus begins the story of 85-year-old Addie and her family living in the multi-cultural North End of Boston at the turn of the last century.   I must confess. I love this book and the voice of Addie Baum so much I almost missed my stop this week.  I think Book Groups would find plenty of meat to pick off the bones of this book and it comes out in December. 

It would seem that The State Which Shall Not Be Named is a place to avoid at all costs and not for the usual reasons.  Here’s DJ Jazzy Patty McC to explain why. “An uninvited guest arrived at our house last week. The cold, flu and virus season has officially moved in and I am feeling inhospitable. Our friends across the hall (he’s a surgeon and she’s an ER pediatric nurse) have assured me that we are not alone in the land of illness and quarantine. So this week, I’m going to keep things brief and to the point. Get a flu shot. Do it now. My autumnal equinox wish for you is that you have no uninvited guests. They’re hard to get rid of, they don’t want to leave and they don't clean up after themselves.”

DL LISTENING TO THE EQUINOX 2014

DL Fall into Change 2013

 

 

 

 


 

 

You Are What You Read!

First of all, a big thanks to Pamela M for the taffy from of all places, Alaska. Who knew one could Summer in Alaska?  Well, Pamela M did.  Thanks Pam!  I just need to say that I am holding fast to summer.  While I had to forsake the sandal this week because the Dayton 10 just got too cold, I am still working the white pants.  The Ever Fabulous Babs B is looking pointedly in the other direction pretending that fashion faux pas is not happening on her watch.   On Tuesday morning, I was mourning the fact that summer was indeed creeping away from me, that it was only 8:00 in the morning and everything I tried my hand at was epically failing, and that the week seemed to stretch way too long ahead.  It was a pity party for one and it wasn’t pretty.  And then I looked out the train window for this week’s message from The SoNo Loft.  And there it was, “You are what you read!”  It made me laugh out loud and then I am afraid I whooped.  My apologies to the man who was sitting next to me; if you are out there Sir, I swear I am mentally stable most of the time so there was no need to try to shrink into the window and away from me.  And just like that the day turned around and things did not seem so daunting.  So, a huge thank you to Think Around Corners and Greg C, the mad geniuses behind the message each week.  You all will never know how much I delight when the train is pulling into  the South Norwalk Station because of you! In their honor, go out of your way this weekend to gladden someone’s path and remember to thank those that gladden yours in ways big and small.  This week we have some Maine, devastation, cottage cheese containers, the G8, Australia, Burma, a bookstore, and some grieving elephants.   And, of course, from The State Which Shall Not Be Named we have The Playlist.

Let us begin!

Abby has turned to a favorite series this week with The Bone Orchard by Paul Doiron.  “A while ago I wrote about a mystery series by Paul Doiron featuring Maine State Game Warden Mike Bowditch.  I’m happy to report that Doiron’s latest, The Bone Orchard, is a highly enjoyable read which highlights his obvious love of the outdoors. I never like to reveal too much about a mystery, but I will say in book 4 of the series Mike must step outside his zone of comfort to come to the aid of his friend and mentor. I find Doiron’s writing has an effective and unique rhythm. He has a beautiful way of setting a scene and getting to the heart of his characters.”

Sweet Ann has just finished The Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami.  “Tsukuru was part of a close group of high school friends who did everything together.  After graduation, Tsukuru is the only one who chose to go to university away from where he and his friends live.  By the end of his sophomore year, his friends refuse to see him or answer his calls. This devastates him and he is never the same again.  It is as if all his joy in life is gone.  Sixteen years later, he meets a woman he would like to date.  On their first date she asks questions about his high school experience and for the first time he reveals his lost friendships.  As they continue to date, she says he must resolve his past before they can move forward. She then convinces him to return to his hometown to discover the reason for his exclusion. The story follows Tsukuru as he searches for life's meaning and redemption.  It is a wonderful read about image, friendship, loss and reconciliation.  “

Thomas S aka My Son is here with something he’s been reading in between his school assignments.  Please don’t call Social Services on me. I swear I did the best I could. “The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth is easily the best book I have read this summer, and probably one of the best YA novels I have ever read in my life. It deals with all of the wondrous teenage anxieties that come from living in a small town filled with evangelicalism, bigotry, and thinking that your ‘sinful behavior’ contributed to the deaths of your parents. The coping mechanisms the main character uses are fantastic: making a doll house filled with random cottage cheese containers and moss, and renting creepy David Bowie vampire flicks on VHS. Upon the conclusion of book two, I found myself crying in the corner while Brand New's Play Crack the Sky played on my stereo. It was a truly magical experience. “


Virginia, everyone’s favorite Tall Cool Texan, is back and she has been busy!  What up VA We missed you! “The past couple of weeks I lost many an hour to two of my favorite authors. I have some good news for fans of Lianne Moriarty and some bad news for fans of Lee Child.  Let’s start with the bad.  I love the Jack Reacher series.  I read the entire series last summer start to finish and was not disappointed.  I have waited a whole year to get my Jack Reacher fix and when I started reading Personal I found it very unsatisfying.   Reacher finds himself pulled back into the military to help stop an attack on the G8 Summit after a sniper tries to assassinate the French president.  The expertise of the marksman has led government and military intelligence to narrow the suspect pool down to a handful of individuals; one of which is a man who spent the last 15 years in jail thanks to Reacher.  The government has asked for Jack’s help in tracking the suspect down but are they using him as bait?  All of the elements were there, but something was missing.  Jack Reacher’s personality and idiosyncrasies were gone and the impossible escapades were toned down.  The best way I can describe it is to say it is Jack Reacher lite.  On the flip side, Liane Moriarty delivered big with Big Little Lies.  I love how Moriarty writes; her engaging tone makes you want to turn the page.  In her latest book, she continues her winning way  of writing from multiple women’s perspectives slowly revealing how their lives intersect.  Unlike The Husband’s Secret, her latest book is darkly humorous, but don’t worry. The story contains all of the twists and turns we anticipate from Moriarty.  The book starts with a tragic death during a parent’s night at a local elementary school in an affluent seaside community in Australia.  Moriarty then builds the story backwards, showing how three women, each at a crossroads in their life, played a role in the evening’s tragic ending.  I found it funny and thrilling with surprising depth.  It’s an absolutely wonderful read.” 


Pat T has finished the sequel to the Art of Hearing Heartbeats.  “The Well-Tempered Heart by Jan Philip Sendker follows Julia's story 10 years later.  She is a successful attorney at a crossroads in her life. One day, while preparing for a presentation, she hears the haunting voice of a wailing woman. Julia decides to return to her father's homeland of Burma to understand what she is hearing. With the help of her half-brother U Ba, they discover that it is the voice of a dead woman, Nu Nu, and together they learn the sad tale of Nu Nu's life.  In the search for answers, this becomes a journey of self-discovery for Julia, a stronger bond between brother and sister and of course a romance.”


Hello Steph!  What’s doin’?  “This weekend I read The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin. What a sweet and funny book! Fikry is a bookstore owner on a small island whose life has been going steadily downhill since his wife’s death, but the shocking discovery of a toddler abandoned in his bookstore changes his life quite a bit! A small mystery and a lovely romance round this out into a nice beach read for those who want to sneak in one more this year or alternatively if you’re already looking forward to fall, it would also be a pleasant fireplace read. This is perfect for fans of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry.”

 Erin, Steph,  and I were invited to a Very Fancy Author Dinner for Jodi Picoult this week.  As you all know I never, ever say no to talking books and I most surely never, ever say no to dinner; most especially a Fancy Dinner.  But frankly, I dreaded the whole idea of singing for my Fancy Author Dinner which was reading Jodi’s new book which is coming out October. The last book of hers that I had read and enjoyed was My Sister’s Keeper which came out in 2005.  That’s all I am going to say about that.  But, from the moment I picked Leaving Time, I remembered why I liked her back in the day.  Jenna is a thirteen-year-old girl whose mother Alice is a scientist who specializes in elephants; specifically elephants and how they grieve.  Alice has been missing for the majority of Jenna’s life and Jenna refuses to believe that she could be dead.  So she enlists the help of Serenity Jones, a formerly famous TV Psychic and Virgil Stanhope, an alcoholic private detective. The story is told in alternating voices but it is the voice of Alice and her field notes on the grieving rituals of elephants that make this so compelling.  This one is due out in October.

DJ Jazzy Patty McC has something to say from The State Up North. Will she be North enough to see this?  There has to be something worthy about living up there.   “This was a weird week in my world. I’m blaming the last full perigee moon of the year. Please don’t tell Neil deGrasse Tyson I said that. I know, I know correlation is not causation and if he found out it might make him cranky and nobody likes a cranky astrophysicist. I’m stuck in a few transitions. Back to school, summers’ nearing end, the beginning of one thing and the end of another. I am not ready to say goodbye to summer and we don’t officially have to do that until September 22nd. So, I still have my shorts, white jeans and one pair of flip-flops on hand. But I can resist the seasonal change for only so long before I’ll be forced to throw my hands up in surrender and shrug on a sweater or coat of some sort. So if you’re stuck in a transition of your own, it’s perfectly ok to sit there for a while. Look up at the sky, contemplate, reflect and move on when you are ready. Like the planets and stars above we operate on our own specific timetable of movement and change. And let’s face it, saying goodbye is something that is very, very hard to do.”

DL SEASON OF RESISTANCE, RESISTANCE IS FUTILE 2014

 

 

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