You Are What You Read

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Welcome to The Hunter’s Moon edition of You Are What You Read.  Yup the full moon is tomorrow and I am here to tell you that this month is no better than last.  DJ Jazzy Patty McC. will be addressing just this in our weekly playlist.  I have no Sweet Ann words of wisdom this week but I do have something rather charming to relate.  On my commute, I have spied a loft in SoNo that has been hanging inspiring hand lettered messages on a banner from their deck.   Every morning I make an effort to see what the message is and I can’t lie that it does add some much needed whimsy to what, of late, can be a rather bleak commute  One of this week’s messages was ‘Dream your future.’  I am sure that Sweet Ann would approve this message.  This week we have some despair, melodrama, a head injury, a talk show, murderous tribes, serious drinking,  killer whales, disappointment, divorce, a motorcycle club and of course, our weekly playlist.

Let us begin!

John who is off getting married this weekend sent this in before he left.   I know that you join me in wishing him and his lovely bride nothing but the best.  “I have been thoroughly engrossed in a fascinating book, A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki.  This parallel story begins when one of the central characters, Ruth, discovers among debris from the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake, washed up on the distant shores of British Columbia, a neatly wrapped plastic parcel containing a diary written by a thirteen-year-old Japanese girl who seems to be chronicling the days leading up to her suicide.  The novel cuts back and forth between the diary entries and the story of Ruth's determination to find out more about the Japanese girl, Nao.  Nao, it turns out, was a Japanese American who lived in California all of her life until the dot-com bust when she and her family had to return to Japan.  Upon her return, Nao is teased mercilessly by her classmates while her mother and father fall deeper into despair. Amid this crisis, she connects with her anarchist, Buddhist nun grandmother while planning her own demise.  This is an extraordinary novel from two very distinct voices.  Nao's narrative is so crisp, clear and unapologetic. I live for writing that brings characters like her to life and because I'm only halfway through the novel, I worry for her and her fate.  This is a must-read.”

Sweet Ann has two offerings this week.  “I finished Songs of Willow Frost by Jamie Ford this week and wanted to share that I think this is an interesting book that will keep you engaged.  It does talk about the early movie business and as I finished reading it, I thought of it as an engrossing melodrama from the 30's and 40's.   I have to start this review by saying I love Liane Moriarty.  I like the way she writes, her characters and the situations she presents.  The first book I read of hers was What Alice Forgot.  Alice wakes up from a head injury and thinks her marriage and life are perfect, but the injury has caused her to forget the past ten years when her life has been spinning out of control.  In The Husband's Secret, Cecilia Fitzpatrick thinks her life with her husband and children is just about perfect until she finds a sealed letter from her husband that instructs her not to open it until after his death.  Cecilia waits, probably longer than others would, but the letter is finally opened.  What is in the letter is shocking and will have ramifications for the family, friends and others in the town. I have now heard from various friends of mine that I should not do the same with them because they had many suggestions on opening and then resealing envelopes.”

Sue S.  has finished reading and really enjoyed these two very different books.  150 Pounds by Kate Rockland which is a truly delightful read starring Alexis Allbright, of Skinny Chick, and Shoshana Weiner, who writes Fat and Fabulous who are both Bloggers. Both are hungry for success. But the similarities stop there. When both appear as panelists on a popular talk show, their lives intersect in ways neither could have imagined. This book is comedic, makes you laugh out loud  and is familiar to any woman who's ever stepped on a scale.   I am reading Doctor Sleep: A Novel by Stephen King   because I loved The Shining but it's totally making me sleep with the lights on! The story picks up on a now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of The Shining) and how he must save a very special twelve-year-old girl from a tribe of murderous paranormals. It's well written with classic creepiness by the King of it himself!

Steph also enjoyed Doctor. Sleep.  Here is her take. “This week I read Stephen King’s new book, Doctor Sleep. This book is a sequel of sorts to The Shining, and you won’t be surprised to hear that poor tortured Danny Torrance, last seen barely surviving his father and the Overlook Hotel, has not made it into adulthood with a clean bill of mental health. Rather, he’s a violent alcoholic, and one pretty close to rock bottom at that, because he’s found that the only way to quiet the shining in his head is to drink constantly. Meanwhile, in another part of the country, a young girl is growing up with powers  even more powerful than Danny’s were—and even further away, a roving band of very scary folks called the True Knot are looking for kids just like her in order to stay alive. It’s all classic King, with the unnerving touches and perfect dialogue we’ve come to expect from him, but it’s layered with something more. King, himself a recovering alcoholic, has matured quite a lot since The Shining, and it shows in this book. His writing about addiction is heart wrenching, and adds a human dimension to the creep factor, much as he did in 11/22/63. You don’t have to have read The Shining to enjoy this one, but if you did, you’ll love it all the more.” 

Won’t you all please welcome Marie to our ranks?  She began as one of our favorite patrons and now she is one of us and working in Materials Management.  “Science and nature is one of my favorite genres so I am really enjoying Death at SeaWorld:  Shamu and the Dark Side of Killer Whales in Captivity by David Kirby.  I would recommend viewing the SeaWorld show with trainers in the tank on YouTube for an unbelievable visual after completing this book!”

Jeanne.  Always.  Two things at once. “Amy Tan has once again brought us a compelling story of a daughter's relationship with her mother that is rife with disappointment, struggle and search for love. Violet is growing up in Shanghai at the turn of the 20th century when her mother decides it is not safe to stay there and flees her once-prosperous house of pleasure and books passage to return to her family home in San Francisco. Tan seduces us with riddles of the heart, loyalty and power as well as the mystery of a small landscape painting titled, The Valley of Amazement. I am also reading Kate DiCamillo's new book, Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures.  I think everyone should read a good children's book on a regular basis and DiCamillo's writing has heart, it's smart and it's humorous (I love Because of Winn Dixie.) In this new graphic novel, Flora Belle Buckman is a young, self-described cynic with recently divorced parents, often left to her own devices and Ulysses is a squirrel. They meet in a most unusual way and the wonderful illustrations and clever antics make for plenty of adventures for them and the reader. Highly recommended!

Miss Elisabeth of the CL breaking any stereotype you may have had of what Children’s Librarians consume when not putting on Story Times. Proceed with caution on this one.  ”This week I haven’t read anything, because I have been completely and entirely consumed by Sons of Anarchy. We have it at the library and seasons 1-4 are streaming on Netflix, and though I never thought I would love a hyper-violent show about an outlaw motorcycle club, man, have I been sucked in! The storytelling is superb, and once I picked up on the fact that showrunner Kurt Sutter is retelling Shakespeare’s Hamlet, I loved it even more. For a story based on such tragic source material, the show also has some great light-hearted moments, especially in the first seasons, and a swoon-worthy romance between Jax, played by the delicious Charlie Hunnam, and Tara, his childhood sweetheart. In the newer seasons, it’s been fascinating to watch Jax (aka Hamlet’s) descent into darkness, and the acting on the show is altogether excellent. I highly recommend it!”

DJ Jazzy Patty McC. as always has her fingers on the pulse of what’s doing in our Library World.  “So, I can only speak for myself at any given time and place but things have been a little weird within my own universe as of late.  I think I can safely say it’s been a tad bit off-kilter for my colleagues as well.  I can only chalk it up to the impending full moon and maybe lack of HVAC.  This week I encourage you all to channel your inner Neil deGrasse Tyson, enjoy the full moon on Saturday and be swept away by the pulls and tides of our planetary existence.  Happy weekend all and here is this week's playlist!”
 

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Happy Friday to you all!  This week has shaped up to be much better than the last. The New York Girls are happily back to a commutation time that is reasonable,  I am back on a train and off I-95, and the crisp beautiful Fall days just keep coming.   With this in mind, Patty McC.aka DJ Jazzy Patty has some reflections on change this week.  While not always welcome, it is the one thing that we can always count on.  Sweet Ann would like to remind everyone that when you are having back problems, Pilates and Body Pump are not necessarily your friends.  She also has concern about my mood which can best be described as pensive.  I am sure things will be fine.  This week we have an emotional roller coaster, some India, London, New York, the return of Bridget, a Vampire attack, big honking pearls and what is becoming our weekly playlist. 

Let us begin.

Pat T. is listening this week. “I have just started listening to the audio book And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini. It begins with a father telling his son a bedtime story which is quite an emotional roller coaster but thankfully it has a redemptive ending! As in his two previous books, The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, Hosseini proves to be a masterful storyteller who weaves together heart wrenching stories with characters that confront emotional and moral dilemmas.”

Pat S. has left the playing fields of professional football and is back at more Pat S. like pursuits. ” For Anglophiles everywhere, this one's for you! Daughter of Empire:  My Life as a Mountbatten by Lady Pamela Hicks.  Born in 1929 into a storied family, a close relative of the British Royal family, Lady Pamela Hicks tells of growing up in the rarefied world of rank and privilege where she was an eye witness to key historical events.  Growing up in England with the Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret as playmates, and being stashed with the Vanderbilts in New York during the war, Lady Pamela then moved to India where her parents were the last Viceroy and Vicerine of India they were tasked not with strengthening the Empire, but dismantling it. Her portraits of a fragile Ghandi, a charismatic Nehru, and a host of who’s who of the international jet set make for a fascinating read. Delightfully, Lady Pamela's bird’s-eye-view of people and events is recounted without any attempt at armchair psycho-analyzing. Perhaps it is the British sang-froid, but I found it refreshing to read about a woman who has lived an uncommonly interesting life-and appreciates her good fortune.  The memoir covers the first thirty years of her life before her marriage to David Hicks, international style icon. Hopefully, volume two will open at the dawn of Swinging Sixties in London!”

Miss Elisabeth of the CL is not exactly thrilled with her pick this week.  We wish her a better one next week! “This week I read Samantha Shannon's The Bone Season. There's been a lot of press and critical acclaim for the book, which is the first in a planned series of 7, and I was expecting to enjoy it immensely, as it has been proclaimed in more than one place to be ‘Harry Potter for grownups.’ The story follows Paige Mahoney, a citizen of Scion London. In this dystopian future, all psychic ability has been outlawed by punishment of death. Paige, who has a rare power that makes her a target for all different factions, is taken to a new type of prison for psychic creatures which throws everything she thought she knew about life into question.   While I enjoyed the book, I didn't love it, which surprised me. I thought the main character's power was lamely executed. She's supposed to be all powerful and very scary. Unfortunately, the reader never really gets to see her be powerful or all that scary. She's spunky and strong, but she's billed as a hurricane, and never lives up to the power you expect her to display. I kept comparing the book unfavorably  to Daniel O'Malley's magnificent The Rook, which featured similar characters and was infinitely superior in every way. “

Babs B! A review from Babs can be as rare as a unicorn sighting but when she gets excited about something and feels compelled to share then you just know it is going to be good.  This week she is excited to tell us about Margot by Jillian Cantor.  “Imagine if Anne Frank's sister Margot managed to survive the Holocaust and start a new life in the United States!  This is the premise for this book that breathes life into a character we know only from her sister's famous diary. The year is 1959 and Margot is living in Philadelphia working as a secretary in a Jewish law firm.  She is now Margie Franklin who has a secret:  a life she once lived and a past and a religion she has denied.  As she begins to fall in love with a young law partner, Margie is forced to come to terms with Margo, with the people she loved, and with a life swept up in the course of history.  I really enjoyed this story.”

Steph is also excited this week by the reappearance of an old literary friend.  “This week I was surprised by one of the highlights of my reading year: the new Bridget Jones book! She’s back! In Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy, Bridget has been plunged into the twenty-first century, and not altogether happily. As you may have seen in the news, Helen Fielding made the controversial choice to kill off Mr. Darcy, and we reunite with Bridget five years after his death, as she tries to balance her writing career with single motherhood, amidst her friends trying to convince her to get back out in the dating world.  When she does, she finds dating has become even more of a minefield thanks to Twitter, online flirting, and texting. (She quickly establishes a new list of dating rules, leading with 1. Don’t text while drunk.) In many ways she’s satisfyingly the same old Bridget, eating shredded cheese out of the packet, reading self-help books, and worrying about everything, especially after she lands a cute thirty something. But the book is also threaded with her guilt and grief over Mark’s death and the challenges of modern parenthood. I wouldn’t go so far as to say Bridget has matured, could we still love her if she did, but she’s certainly changed for the better. Fans of the first two books will love this new one, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it wins her some new admirers as well.”

Amanda says, “When Elisabeth of the Children’s Library raved about The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black last week, she was not telling lies.  This book is so good that I’d have to quit my job and just read if all books were this level of entertaining. The heroine is a believable teenager whose actions are driven by the need to survive after a vampire attack. Unlike other heroines in the genre, Tana is not moping around or giving up on life. She makes tough decisions, gets beaten up, betrayed, but  keeps pressing on. Nothing is going to take her down without a fight. Black’s book is action packed from the first page until the end. It does not look like there’s going to be a sequel or a series which is a relief. The book ends on a perfectly epic note which just feels so right. How many books can you say that about? “I for one am relieved that Amanda is over her bad book picks this week. 

I have spent the week dwelling delightfully in another place and time.  The Fishing Fleets:  Husband Hunting in the Raj by Anne de Courcy examines the years of British rule in India.  Hordes of young men leaving England to secure their fortunes in India proved irresistible to the young English women they left behind.    So what to do?  Why board a ship and seek them out!  With the ratio of 4 men to each woman matrimonial success was all but guaranteed.   Also guaranteed?  A social whirlwind filled with balls, tiger hunts and pearls the size of golf balls worn by Maharajas. But this was no fairy tale.  These young women were truly pioneers who went into places where there were few other Europeans, disease and very real dangers.  This is a fascinating look at a vanished world that is out in January and will be in the catalog next week.  

DJ Jazzy Patty McC. leaves us with the following thought this weekend. “How can you welcome in a new season without saying goodbye to another?  This makes me contemplate change.  Change is never easy.  Change is difficult at best but in the end, sometimes change makes us all better human beings.  We all change in subtle and sometimes profound ways every day.  This week my music playlist is dedicated to our own Louise Berry, Kiera Parrott and Gretchen Caserotti.  Although you can only virtually hug Gretchen at this point, I encourage you all to give a big hug of thanks to Louise and Kiera.  (Ok, if you’re not a hugger, just thank them.)  These female trailblazers have collaborated and built a phenomenal temple of knowledge in town that is the envy of many.  I wish them only the best as they turn the next page on the chapter of their lives.  We should all welcome it, embrace it and fall into change. If that’s not a music theme fit for a playlist, I don’t know what is!! Rock on, ladies…  DL Fall into Change 2013

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Welcome to a very special edition of You Are What You Read.  This week we present to you, You Are What You Read:  The Road to Hell.  Our commute, and we are sure yours as well,  this week has been nothing but painful.  It doesn’t matter if you are on a train  ( the New York Girls are reporting up to 2 hours for a one way trip), or if you are in a car (for myself, almost an hour and a half one morning), the transit woes are killing us.  Sweet Ann’s words of wisdom for the week come from one of her neighbors growing up.  Ann wants us all to remember this: “You can take a Local.  You can take an Express.  But you don’t get off until you reach Success.”  Sadly I think that just reaching your destination with body and soul intact is what constitutes success at this point.  But, I would like to note also that this is the mettle of the people I work with.  Once they get here you would never know that their world is anything less than sunshine, rainbows and unicorns.  So, here is hoping that I can report next week that the New York Girls are not spending 2 hours on a train to go some 50 or so miles (some of us walk faster), that I can get back on the train and out of my car, and that going forward this will be a dim, sad memory.    This week we have a know-it-all, Purgatory, The Iron Lady, creepy usage of a riding crop, sharks, logging, six pack abs and some grit, fear and death, the Netherlands, a group home and a little gift.


Let us begin!


Miss Kiera of the CL is one of the New York Girls who has been dealing with the hellish commute. You will please note that she has done so with a smile.  She’s excited about an old favorite doing new things. “Kevin Henkes, perhaps best known for his beloved and award-winning picture books like Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse, has a new chapter book out: The Year of Billy Miller. Billy is just about to enter second grade when a small accident causes him to wonder, ‘Am I smart enough for second grade?’ His new teacher wears chopsticks in her hair and rings a gong, his tablemate Emma is a know-it-all, and his little sister Sal is starting to get on his very last nerve. And the year has just begun! This is funny, realistic fiction with short episodic chapters and a large typeface. It's a great transitional book for children who are reading independently (but perhaps not quite ready for longer, more complex texts.) I hope to see many more Billy Miller stories from Mr. Henkes! “


Miss Elisabeth of the CL:  Another New York Girl with an amazing sense of grace in a bad situation.  Seriously.   You would totally want these people next to you in a fox hole.  If that should happen to be where you find yourself.   I hope not.  “This week I read Patrick  Ness’ beautiful, marvelous, wonderful, gorgeous More Than This. The first line of the book? ‘Here is the boy, drowning.’  Chills! I get chills! And it only gets better from there. 16-year-old Seth has drowned in the ocean and had his head smashed in by rocks. The last line in the first chapter? ‘He drowns.’ But then! Then he opens his eyes and wakes up in a strange, deserted version of the small English town he grew up in. Is he in hell? Is he in purgatory? Has he traveled to a new world? Or is there something far more sinister at play? I adored this book, for the deep questions it asks about guilt and family and love, for the beautiful way it’s written, and especially for the fact that when the book turns, you are truly gob smacked, and there are even more questions to ponder about the internet and technology and the future of humanity. “


Steph!  A New York Girl slogging it out this week with humor and poise!  Stephanie begins this week’s reflection with a question. “Am I sold on 1979 being the birth of the new century? No, not really. I think that’s just goofy marketing tactics. But Strange Rebels by Christian Caryl makes for interesting reading anyway. In 1979, many interesting things happened in the world; Caryl focuses on the election of Margaret Thatcher, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan (and subsequent US response), Pope John Paul II’s travels (especially to Poland), the Iranian Revolution, and Deng Xiaoping’s economic reforms in China. Though he focuses on the economic and political ramifications of all this chaos, and especially how they intersected, he also provides succinct biographies of the principals involved. I mean, I think those things are interesting. If it sounds interesting to you, you will probably love this book. Caryl’s characterizations of the people and pivotal events of 1979 are deft and enthralling, which is especially impressive given the amount of detail included here. I have a few political quibbles, but overall, one of the more engaging non-fiction books I’ve picked up this year."


Amanda, while not affected by the commutation woes, is still cranky and is a powerful reminder of the usefulness of an awesome audio book to make the time fly.  And, alternatively,  the sadness that a bad one can induce.  “‘Reader, I hurled,’ is one of my favorite quotes which aptly applies to Catherine Coulter’s Night Fire.  I had a long car trip last week and this book was recommended to me. If I had had something better to listen to, I would have done so.   This book is about Arielle, who at 16 was forced to wed her much older neighbor. At the end of his riding crop, she suffers severe beatings and degrading sexual acts. Like a miracle, he finally chokes to death. Arielle believes she is free. That is until the Earl of Ravensworth comes home from the Napoleon wars. He’s smitten with the girl Arielle was at 15 and he’ll do anything to possess her. The tactics of Ravensworth make him barely better than Arielle’s dead husband. Stay clear unless you like a lot of brutality in your romance. The book’s reader also sounds like a grandmother which somewhat makes everything that much worse. “


Birthday Girl Erin who has no commuting woes remains her usual sunny, sassy self.  “I have been on a MOVIE ROLL lately so I would like to share what I’ve been watching. Kon-Tiki is a Norwegian film that was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. It follows a group of Norwegian adventurers who attempt to float a raft from Peru to French Polynesia to prove that the islands were settled from the east instead of the west. Along the way they encounter sharks, storms, and self-doubt. And for people who read and loved Gone Girl, I’d like to recommend the movie Side Effects. A young wife suffering from depression is prescribed a new drug that causes intense sleep walking episodes. I don’t want to tell you what happens next but there are twists! There are turns! There is Channing Tatum! And the last film I’d like to recommend, which is now in theaters, is Ron Howard’s Rush. It’s based on the true story of a 1970s race car rivalry between James Hunt and Niki Lauda. It would make the perfect date movie because there are race cars, suspense, fire, and Chris Hemsworth (even though I’m Team Liam, I’m not blind).”


Abby is off on another mystery series kick. “I just finished Massacre Pond, the 4th book in the Paul Doiron detective mystery series set in the Down East wilderness. Filled with Maine culture both high and lower-brow, our hero is Maine State Game Warden Mike Bowditch, ironically, the son of a big time poacher. Perpetually in the work doghouse, Mike must investigate a brutal slaughter of wildlife that appears to be part of a campaign against the establishment of a new national park.  Those against the park fear they will be blocked from accessing their beloved wilderness costing much needed logging jobs and access to hunting to feed their families. Those in favor believe they are saving that same space for future generations. As the two sides square off, Mike has some serious investigating and soul searching to do. “


Alan, a man who seems to have no commuting issues this week, chimes in with two series he is rather fond of.  “Lee Child’s latest Jack Reacher novel, Never Go Back, is the best of his recent novels in this series. Reacher, whose polymath brain is equal to his immensely strong body (we get a description of his six-pack abs and cantaloupe-sized biceps at one point) is dealing this time with a conspiracy at the top of the government. Teaming up, for the moment, with a strong female character, he gets himself out of jams with his brain or his fists, crosses the country in search of resolution, and brings things to a satisfying conclusion before setting off, alone, again. If you like Lee Child’s Reacher series, you’ll be very pleased with this; if you don’t know it, this is a good place to try it out.   George Pelecanos is a really good writer – of his dozen or so books that focus on crime in the District of Columbia and of the TV series The Wire and Treme. In The Double, to be published October 8, he’s written a second book about Spero Lucas, the young, tough, sensitive, still-has-a-lot-to-learn, searcher for missing things, who seems to find trouble wherever he looks, but has the grit and guile to resolve things, often with jarring violence. In this case he’s looking for a stolen painting, while resolving some other issues – like murder. A sensitive, strong protagonist, great writing, and you’d-think-you-were-there descriptions of the DC you don’t see as a tourist – a very satisfying read.”


I have not heard John complaining about his commute this week but since he lives even further north than I do I cannot imagine it was any sort of Mardi Gras.  In fact, I would imagine it was pretty much the morning after Mardi Gras in nature.  Sort of headachy, smelly, and full of regret.  This is probably why we have two things from John this week.  “In anticipation of Carol Rifka Brunt's visit to Darien Library on October 10th, I decided to read Tell the Wolves I'm Home.  It's an incredibly compelling and heart-wrenching story about a thirteen year-old girl whose uncle, whom she adores, dies of AIDS.  The novel takes place during the early days of the insidious disease and it reminds us that when it was first emerging, AIDS was shrouded in a cloak of fear, intolerance, and homophobia. I was only slightly younger than the main character, June, during that time and I remember how those with AIDS were stigmatized and dismissed as deviants. This novel explores that time in a very human way.  I would classify this as a YA (young adult) novel, based upon the writing and voice (first-person from June's point of view).  Yet this is an important YA book because it is representative of how much that genre has evolved over the past decade.  This is a serious novel with serious subject matter that can be read by both teens and adults.  I've also just begun (and am halfway through) the short novel, Tinkers, by Paul Harding.  The novel is framed as a series of remembrances  by George Washington Crosby on his deathbed.  They primarily focus on his father, a tinker who sold goods and trinkets from a mule-cart in rural Maine and who suffered from epilepsy in a time when people thought that affliction was a type of insanity.  This is a painfully beautiful book that is more of a series of meditations on the wonder of life and its intricacies. Naturally the theme of the tinker--a person whose livelihood depends on fiddling with intricate metalwork--carries over into the complexity of the natural world around us.  This is a wonderful little book (and no wonder it took the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for fiction). It's like an amuse-bouche for your soul.”


Barbara M. No commuting trauma.  Reading about World War II.  Like life is normal.   I want to live in Barbara’s alternate universe for a while. “I’m reading Dancing with the Enemy by Paul Glaser.   Paul Glaser grew up Roman Catholic in the Netherlands. When he was 35 his friend casually mentioned that Glaser was a common Jewish name in Vienna and then later while visiting the museum in Auschwitz he saw a valise with the name Glaser on it. His suspicions aroused, he confronted his father who confirmed what Paul Glaser had suspected – his father’s family was Jewish.   When the author investigated what happened to his family during WWII he became especially interested in his Aunt Rosie’s story and this is the story he focuses on in the book. Rosie was a talented ballroom dancer who was able to circumvent the forced deportation of Jews to work and concentration camps until her ex-husband betrayed her. Her wits and her charms helped her survive the many camps she was sent to.  This book describes an unusual view of Dutch complicity during the Nazi occupation of Holland.”


Sweet Ann wants us all to keep smiling and brings us The Songs of Willow Frost by Jamie Ford.  “I am midway through this novel and I am beginning to enjoy it more.  The story takes place in 1934 Seattle as twelve year old William Eng searches for his mother.  William has been living in a group home ever since he was a young child when his mother was whisked off to the hospital.  He believes he has seen his mother in a film and hears that the actress will be in Seattle in the near future. William escapes the home and meets up with the actress who is his mother.  She begins to tell him what happened in her life and how they both ended up where they are.  As her story enfolds I am more intrigued.”


And finally from DJ Jazzy Patty McC. we have a musical valentine/Band-Aid/salve for all of us who fought the commutation fight for the last couple of days.   Thanks Patty!  Life is indeed better with a soundtrack. “No doubt life is better with a soundtrack and it’s no secret that I’m a music lover.  In my opinion, we should all have a theme song.  It would be even more fantastic if it played when we walked into a room.  So with this front of mind, I began contemplating my sweet librarian’s hellish commute due to the recent transportation snafu.  This week I give you my curated DL The Commute from Hell 2013.  You can thank me later.  Today this is your daily slice of awesomeness. “

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

This has been a challenging week for all of us and we can’t say we aren’t happy to see it end.   No matter that the weather is glorious; it would appear that the full moon weirdness just keeps coming at us.  And please, don’t even get us started on our commutes.

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Welcome to the Harvest Moon Edition of You Are What You Read.  We are big believers that the folklore of the Full Moon is indeed based on some serious fact and if you saw what we see you would be too.  You will notice that there is some decidedly odd stuff going on with us this week.  Sweet Ann has no words of wisdom, Barbara M.

Nice New Book Goodness!

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Summer made what I am hoping was its last stand this week.  I am done with hot and humid and hair that enters a room five minutes before I do.  We owe Marianne an apology.

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

This week the air feels crisper and the days shorter.  Summer is definitely on the wane.  Hello Fall!  This week there are no Sweet Ann Words of Wisdom because Sweet Ann is not here. But I feel sure that if she was she would be admonishing us to grab those last tomatoes and bits of basil and hold tight to what remains of summer.

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Welcome to the last YAWYR for Summer 2013.  The picture is our Labor Day equivalent to The Egg Tree.  Except that Fudge and Taffy are way yummier.  Thanks Patty McC!

Nice New Book Goodness!

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

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