Reviews by louiseberry
Can't put it down
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You won't be able to put this stunning debut thriller down. Kate Moore is an expat with a secret past as a CIA operative. She moves to Luxembourg with her geeky computer analyst husband, and meets expats Julia and Bill, who have secrets as well. The plot is full of deceptions and twists and turns.
Anne Tyler's Beginner's Goodbye
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In Beginner's Goodbye, Aaron is an editor at his family's business, a vanity press, married to a no-nonsense doctor, who always eats 6 Triscuits for a snack, because that is the serving size on the package. When she dies, his life is upended. Tyler's story is a masterpiece of relationships between slightly eccentric characters. We see Aaron's marriage as he relives it after Dorothy dies, his family relationships especially with his bossy older sister, his relationships in his office and with his neighbors. A charming and endearing read.



Masterful historical spy novel
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Alan Furst is a master of the historical spy novel, and his books are so evocative of their settings, mostly pre-WWII in France. In 1938, film star Fredric Stahl is on his way to Paris to make a film. Will he become a part of the Nazi effort to demoralize the French? Furst effectively creates the tension in Paris leading up to the German invasion while all the time immersing us in the ambiance of Paris, the streets, cafes, hotels, and way of life.
Bill Clinton's favorite fictional character
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Daniel Silva's latest thriller features Gabriel Allon who is Bill Clinton's favorite fictional character according to an interview on CBS by Charlie Rose. The body of a young woman is found on the floor of the Sistine Chapel. Was it suicide or murder? Silva's novels are fast paced and suspenseful, and offer insight into the politics of the Middle East from a pro-Israel point of view. The setting for this one includes Rome, Vienna, Berlin, St. Moritz and Jerusalem.
Loved it!
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Billy Beane changed baseball forever when he used computer analysis to find undervalued players, replacing the very subjective "old" ways of recruiting. Fascinating look at the role of the General Manager.