You Are What You Read!

We begin this week with a shout of thanks to Sandy and Jim D for the beautiful floral tribute. No need to apologize that it wasn't taffy or fudge!  Just seeing that lovely arrangement can make one forget all about taffy and fudge!   We thank you and so do our pants!  While I continue to bemoan the fact that summer has left us, The SoNo Loft has moved on and is celebrating the change of season with the message of ‘Leaf on the Wind’. What this means is anyone’s guess.  This week we have Rock & Roll, some potential frustration, Dublin, a power couple, Detroit, New York City, and  some love. Playlist?  Of course!

Let us begin!

Abby has just finished watching 20 Feet From Stardom.  “This is a case of better late than never. I finally watched the Academy Award winning documentary 20 Feet From Stardom. The film introduces us to the voices we grew up listening to and singing along with but we never knew the people behind them. The storytelling is helped along by some of the biggest stars in Rock & Roll who share their appreciation for the backup singers who add layers of complexity and feeling to their work.  One of the highlights for me was learning the story of Merry Clayton, the woman who sang the haunting background on the Rolling Stones hit Gimme Shelter.  Watching Merry sit in the studio listening to a playback of her part is a wonder. I already knew some of Darlene Love’s story. Learning how her career as a solo artist was sabotaged was heartbreaking but her realization that she was meant to sing reclaimed her career. As one of the singers said, when people sing along, they sing OUR parts.  Get ready to get some great music stuck in your head.”

John is looking forward to starting something new.   “I have started a behemoth of a fantasy series The Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson.  I may have set myself up for frustration, however, because with only two of ten planned books written, I’m going to have a hard time sitting on my hands, waiting for the next installment (due sometime in 2015).  The first book, The Way of Kings weighs in at 1007 pages, but the story is so immersive that the time goes by quickly.  I’m on to the second book now, Words of Radiance which, at 1087 pages, is no less captivating.  Sanderson is a master world-builder, and while Game of Thrones fans will undoubtedly think his writing significantly less gritty than they are used to, they may find the pace and storyline compelling enough to break into this series.”

Sweet Ann loves The Secret Place by Tana French.  “This is the fifth novel by Ms. French concerning crimes that the Dublin Murder Squad tries to solve.  Her writing is wonderful and her descriptions transport you to the locales she mentions, whether it is the grittiness of the squad room, or the lush beautiful grounds of a girls' school.  This story tells about the death of a sixteen-year-old student at the nearby boys' school whose bludgeoned body was discovered on the grounds of a girls' school.  The murder occurred a year ago and there has been no progress on the case until a picture of the victim appears with the words ‘I know who killed him’ written on it. The Secret Place is another great mystery by Tana French.”

Pat T is keeping her latest obsession alive. “Last week many of us watched the highly acclaimed PBS TV series The Roosevelt's: an Intimate History. Now that it is over, I am going through withdrawal, so I decided to listen to the audio book Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage by Hazel Rowley and narrated by one of my favorite narrators, Tavia Gilbert. Just like the Kennedy's and the Clinton's, there has been much speculation about the Roosevelt's marriage, and the author gives us a glimpse into the Roosevelt's unconventional marriage. These two people created a partnership according to their own ambitions and needs, yet at the same time supporting and encouraging one another. Hazel Rowley refers to Eleanor Roosevelt's biography, This Is My Story, so I will add this book to my reading pile too!”

Miss Elisabeth of the CL did some very adult reading with the latest by Lauren Beukes.  “I enjoyed reading Broken Monsters but I wouldn’t ever read it again! It’s a very, very dark book. It starts out as a crime thriller: Detroit Homicide Detective Gabriella Versado has caught a particularly gruesome case. A young boy was murdered, cut in half, attached to the bottom of a fawn, and then left in an abandoned tunnel. Soon another body, also horribly disfigured, is found. As Verdosa begins to piece together the madness behind the crimes, we also follow the stories of a failed reporter newly arrived in Detroit, Verdosa’s 15-year-old daughter, Layla and her tragic best friend Cass, a reformed criminal named TK, and an artist named Clayton at the end of his rope. The stories begin to come together with the introduction of a seriously disturbing supernatural element. The writing is beautiful, and the author, who is South African, speaks with surprising authority on the decay of Detroit. Still, the end is SO CREEPY. Shudders all around.”


Virginia the Tall Cool Texan is back this week!  What up VA?  “This week, I got my greedy little hands on an advanced copy of the sequel to one of my favorite books of all time, The Rosie Project. Author Graeme Simsion brings back Don Tillman in all of his pathologically, micro-managed, organized glory.  In The Rosie Effect, Don and Rosie are newly married and have left Australia to live in New York. Just as they are adjusting to being newlyweds, (Don has created a schedule and menu to his liking), they find out Rosie is pregnant. This is where the book falls off course for me. The natural assumption would be for Simsion to focus on Don and Rosie’s relationship and how they adjust to the idea of being pregnant and becoming parents.  However, Rosie’s character fades to the background, and Simsion chooses to focus on Don, his conflicting emotions about the pregnancy and his growing relationship with his buddies. In fact, in a lot of ways, this book is more of a bromance than a romance.  This was unfortunate, because I found the magic of The Rosie Project to be the important dynamic between Rosie and Don. She provided a good balance to him, making the reader see his personality quirks as more lovable than annoying. Let’s just say in The Rosie Effect, you don’t have the luxury of this buffer. As with most sequels, I didn’t find The Rosie Effect to have the same charm as the original but it was still an enjoyable read.


Thomas S aka My Son is here and is celebrating his freedom to read whatever he pleases.  Makes a Mom proud actually, or at least this Mom.  “In August of 1998, the recently reunited mid-western emo band Mineral released their single, &Serenading on Crank! Records. The b-side of that single was a totally awesome cover of a song by the band, The Psychedelic Furs. In my own honest opinion, this cover of Love My Way is vastly superior to the original version. You can judge for yourself by clicking here. Continuing the theme of loving your own way, and in honor of Banned Book Week, I have decided to talk about Nancy Garden's Annie on My Mind. First published in July of 1982, this book is groundbreaking because it was really the first novel to explore these themes in a positive light, as opposed to the majority of LGBTQ subjects that were being presented negatively in pulp novels. I will admit, some elements of the story are a bit dated, but that should help paint a clearer picture for the reader as to how important this work of fiction truly was. This book broke all the rules set for presenting homosexual characters.  I guarantee that anyone who reads this will walk away thinking about how beautifully the romance was  presented. I think it's this reason that the book was banned in the first place. If you choose to pick this up, remember that you don't know everyone around you 100%, and it's this reason that you should never condemn something that makes someone else happy and doesn't harm the people around them.”

DJ Jazzy Patty Mcc is back this week and feeling much better thank you.  Here’s what she musing about.  “A new season is here that brings us gourds-a-plenty, DIY apple picking, hayrides, apple cider, doughnuts and hours spent wandering lost in giant corn mazes. The cooler temperatures, the new light that filters everything with a soft glow, the changing colors of the leaves all signal a sweet gradual change that will gently ease us into the slumber of winter. We’ve enjoyed some really lovely weather here in my fine state and I’m happy to report everyone is well again. So this week I invite you all to curl up with a book, a steaming mug of something yummy and relish your freedom to read what you want when you want. I can guarantee that this prescription is sure to cure all ills. “

DL LISTEN TO THE BAND 2014

 

Meet Us On Main Street

Mallory Arents and Laura Cavers tag teamed today and it was a perfect match.  Mallory brought energetic edgy picks from the second floor non-fiction collection and introduced the group to two graphic novels, a genre growing in popularity.  Laura served up an assortment of fictional stories -- one being her first audiobook (which she is loving) and a DVD highlighting the obscure life of the back-up singers of the 60's, 70's and 80's.  She recommends it to anyone who stands near the express DVD's by the Welcome Desk.  It is so good that some of the MUOMS members, who have seen it, said they would happily see it again.  It is that great.

New eBooks from 3M

Here are the new eBooks from 3M.

New eBooks from OverDrive

Here are the new titles available from OverDrive.

Nice New Book Goodness

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

You Are What You Read!

To start this week, we give a shout out to Amy C, True Library Friend and our Beloved Board President, who brought us caramels from the spot where she Summers in Montana!  They were EPIC and worth every calorie.  Thanks AmyI have come to the sad realization that I can fight the March of Autumn only so long before even I have to surrender.  The Autumnal Equinox arrives on Monday at 10:29; so officially this is the last weekend for the Summer of 2014. A more beautiful summer I don’t think I have ever seen.  I don’t know about you all but I marvel at how swiftly fall is taking over.  The golden quality of sunlight, the way it’s  getting darker earlier, that bite in the morning air, even the green of the leaves is starting to have that muted characteristic of impending change.  At the Farmer’s Market this week there were still beautiful tomatoes and corn to be had, but there were also plenty of fall squashes, pumpkins, mums, newly dug potatoes, lovely crisp apples and pears. This morning on the train platform I was in the minority with my sleeveless dress and bare leg.  All around me were tweeds and boots and sweaters.  They looked much more comfortable than I felt. So I officially yield to fall and I wish it a long glorious reign because just the thought of winter returning is killing me.  This week we have knife throwing, Queens, (but not Knife Throwing Queens. Sorry), Wonder Woman, some Grand Duchesses, London, The Street and a Boston Girl. You want a soundtrack with all that?  Done!  In fact we are giving you two!

Let us begin!

Miss Elisabeth of the CL is still talking about what she did while Away.  “While I was on vacation, I read 6 adult books, mostly light beach reads and detective thrillers. By far the best one was a brand new book by Chelsea Cain, One Kick. The beginning of a new mystery series, this was a nail-biting suspense novel with the type of heroine you can’t help but root for. When she was six, Kick Lannigan was kidnapped from her front yard.  When she was 11, Kick was accidently rescued by the FBI. Now she’s 21, and she’s spent the past ten years making sure she knows how to keep herself safe: martial arts, sharp shooting, knife throwing skills, and lock-picking are among her many talents. Her quiet, safe life is forever altered when she is drawn into the investigation of two recent child abductions with eerie similarities to her own. I literally could not put this book down. I read it on the plane, and was so engrossed in the story I didn’t notice we were landing until I felt the plane bump the ground! If you like suspenseful mysteries, One Kick is a great pick. “

Barbara M loves herself a Seriously Sad Story.  Here is her latest pick.  “When I started reading We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas I thought it would be an updated version of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, a family saga of the Irish-American experience. In a way, it is an immigrant American family saga but it is so much more. It’s about unfulfilled dreams and how the early onset of Alzheimer’s disease can devastate a family. The book is the beautifully written story of Eileen, a child of Irish immigrants, who has aspirations of escaping her life in Woodside, Queens. When she marries Ed Leary, a promising scientist, she believes that her life will go as she planned. It doesn’t. A sad story exquisitely told.”

Mallory has been talking non-stop about her love for this book.  Seriously.  She won’t stop. Please someone else read this so she can have a Book Friend.  Thank you.  For those of you who want a head start, check out Darien Reads.  “The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore is part biography, part feminist history, part comic legacy, and my new go-to recommendation, so get used to hearing me blab about it.  William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman’s creator, was a man obsessed with truth and justice, surrounded by women who were crusaders during the suffragist and birth control movements of the early 1900’s.  He gets a degree in law, gets a degree in psychology, invents the lie detector, and basically fails at everything he attempts.  Marston marries his high school sweetheart and then takes on a secret live-in wife as well (the feminist Queen Margaret Sanger’s niece).  He has children with each woman and they all live together as one glorious oddball family in a little town called Darien, CT for a short period of time.  Marston imbues Wonder Woman with characteristics from the women he encounters and uses her as a radical agent for social change.  Wonder Woman was powerful, political, and her only weakness was being shackled by man; Marston’s Wonder Woman is my new personal hero. He states, ‘Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who, I believe, should rule the world.’ You’ll find The Secret History of Wonder Woman when it comes out in October, so place your holds now!”

The Fabulous Babs B just finished a book we are pretty wild for, The Romanov Sisters by Helen Rappaport.  Here’s what she thinks.  “This is the history of the four daughters of the tsar of Russia, Nicholas II.  They were the Princess Diana of their day and were much admired for their happy dispositions, their looks, the clothes they wore and their privileged life style.  The girls lived in virtual isolation, their only freedom being when they traveled, usually on the Royal Yacht.  I found it sad that they were constantly surrounded by armed guards.  I also learned that Alexandra, the girl's mother, suffered with numerous health issues throughout her life which severely restricted her lifestyle.  I was drawn to the great love and devotion the Romanovs felt for each other, despite living through the harshest of circumstances. “

Pat S has just finished Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home by Nina Stibbe. “Back in the early 80's, Nina, a young dropout from rural England, decides to try her luck at being a nanny in London. She joins the bohemian household of single mom Mary Kay Wilmers (editor and owner of London Review of Books) and her sons Will and Sam Frears.   She finds herself in a rather rarefied literary world where one of the neighbors is the esteemed playwright Alan Bennett who drops in frequently for dinner, and the ex-husband is Stephen Frears the movie director. Nina does not recognize the names, nor is she impressed when told who they are. She is the anti-Mary Poppins (she neither cooks nor cleans), and fits in perfectly with this colorful, raffish crew. Over a period of the next several years, Nina recounts to her sister Victoria her daily routines and exchanges first as a nanny, and then as a returning university student in this enchanting, laugh out loud collection of letters.  After reading these delightful letters, it made me wonder what will become of the epistolary format now that no-one seems to write letters any longer.”

Here’s Steph and what she’s reading. “This weekend on my commute, I read Business Adventures by John Brooks. This is our selection for September’s Business Book Group, and came to most people’s attention after Bill Gates told an interviewer it was his favorite business book. To be honest, even though I usually like business books, I didn’t have high hopes for this one, because it seemed to be a bunch of random stories from twentieth-century Wall Street. I was so wrong! This book has been a delight. Brooks was a writer for The New Yorker, and each of these stories reads like the sort of article you cut out and pass along to a friend. Whether he’s explaining how a corner works (and what happened the last time someone tried to pull one off), or walking the reader through the growth of Xerox, his writing is funny and clear, and has something to offer both the business novice and the Wall Street expert. I’m really looking forward to discussing it on September 23.”

I must confess that I was not a huge fan of Anita Diamant’s book The Red Tent.  I have found that you either love this book, or you are in my camp:  Camp Pack-Up-Your-Tent-And-Go.  But when I heard her speak at a Library Preview at Simon and Schuster about her new book Boston Girl I was intrigued enough to give it a shot and I am glad I did.  Addie Baum is asked by her granddaughter the following question: “How did you get to be the woman you are today?”  Thus begins the story of 85-year-old Addie and her family living in the multi-cultural North End of Boston at the turn of the last century.   I must confess. I love this book and the voice of Addie Baum so much I almost missed my stop this week.  I think Book Groups would find plenty of meat to pick off the bones of this book and it comes out in December. 

It would seem that The State Which Shall Not Be Named is a place to avoid at all costs and not for the usual reasons.  Here’s DJ Jazzy Patty McC to explain why. “An uninvited guest arrived at our house last week. The cold, flu and virus season has officially moved in and I am feeling inhospitable. Our friends across the hall (he’s a surgeon and she’s an ER pediatric nurse) have assured me that we are not alone in the land of illness and quarantine. So this week, I’m going to keep things brief and to the point. Get a flu shot. Do it now. My autumnal equinox wish for you is that you have no uninvited guests. They’re hard to get rid of, they don’t want to leave and they don't clean up after themselves.”

DL LISTENING TO THE EQUINOX 2014

DL Fall into Change 2013

 

 

 

 


 

 

Meet Us On Main Street

Children's Librarians Claire Moore and Lisa Nowlain talk to Meet Us On Main Street about the books they are reading now.

New eBooks from 3M

Here are the new titles available from 3M.

Nice New Book Goodness

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

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