New DVD Releases

Here is what you can find new to the shelves in the upcoming days.

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

You will notice that this week there seems to be a lot of listening going on.    Not hearing but listening.  There is a difference. Even those of us who normally have our nose stuck in a book are out in the world and getting our reading fix by listening.  I am not sure what to make of this.   It’s funny when you think of it really.  We all begin our reading lives by being listeners.  No one is born reading, but we are all born listening!  I think that maybe this is really about finally getting away from the warmth of our hearths, getting out into the world but still wanting a story even as we create our own. Because sometimes when you are listening, the message you get is not what you were expecting but there is a truth in it just the same that can turn your thinking and your world around. So get out into the world, revel in the warmth and joy of spring, and take a story with you while you create your own.  This week we have Zulus, sniveling, squawking, dogs, Italy, some boys, Bed-Stuy and Commitment Issues.  Playlist, you ask?  But of course!


Let us begin!


Abby is reading Present Darkness by South African writer Malla Nunn. ” Set in the 1950s during the early days of apartheid, Present Darkness reunites us with Detective Sergeant Emmanuel Cooper. Cooper is deeply scarred by his time fighting in Europe and lives with a number of secrets. While I am generally a passionate proponent of reading a mystery series in sequence, it is especially important with this series. Present Darkness finds Cooper investigating the murder of a white couple. When one of the named suspects is the son of his colleague Zulu Detective Samuel Shabalala, Cooper will not let his superiors or brutal racial divides stop him from assisting his friend. Nunn once again treats us to an absorbing mystery and culture while also shedding light upon the toll South Africa’s inhumane apartheid laws took on the nation of South Africa.  This is to be released on June 3rd.”


Sue S.  Not happy.  Not having it.  “Truth be told, I am a girl who devours a great chic-lit book when I get one.  However, there will be no ramblings about butterflies and rainbows or about how this book should be made into a movie. Instead, I will tell you how much I disliked Chances AreAre by Barbara Delinsky.  This book was torture as I was subjected to what should have been a smart, strong female character, but ended up being a sniveling, insecure self-doubting individual who only gains confidence from what I can only describe as a male chauvinistic pig who has never heard of the term ‘No means No’.  I would never recommend this book to anyone who has any sort of self-worth.  If you are looking for a good chic-lit book I do not recommend this one.”


Miss Elisabeth of the CL is as excited as I have ever seen her this week. “This week I devoured, in one sitting, Elaine Lui’s memoir Listen to the Squawking Chicken: When Mother Knows Best, What’s a Daughter to Do? Elaine, or Lainey, is the purveyor of Laineygossip.com, one of my all-time favorite websites. Lainey is an intelligent, witty, take-no-prisoners kind of writer and from her position at the Canadian version of E, she is able to give first-hand accounts of the hypocrisy of celebrities. Her website could be called a guilty pleasure but you will not feel guilty reading it! The Squawking Chicken in the title refers to her Chinese-immigrant mother, a highly-superstitious woman whose squawks have guided Lainey throughout her life. I tore through the book in a mix of fascination, admiration, and horror. Her mother’s determination that she make something of herself and complete aversion to coddling or praising her daughter is something rarely seen in western parenting. You might think that her mom’s reliance on shame, Feng Shui, blackmail, and horrific storytelling as parenting techniques would backfire, but instead Lui’s love and admiration for her mother shines through every page, even when her mother is forcing her to eat a papaya every morning to keep her luck, disparaging her ‘low classy’ roommate, or asking for ‘no tax! ‘at the Pottery Barn. With chapter titles like, ‘I Should Have Given Birth to a Piece of Barbecue Pork’ ‘Miss Hong Kong is a Whore’ and ‘You Will Be Thanking Me Your Entire Life,’ the book is laugh-out-loud funny in addition to making you really want to call your mom. I loved it, and I’ll never bring home anything I found on the street again!”


Pat T is embracing the season.  “Throughout April, we are celebrating National Poetry Month and on Tuesday we celebrated Earth Day, so I thought it fitting to share one of my favorite poets, whose work reflects our connection to nature. Dog Songs: Thirty Five Dog Songs and One Essay by Mary Oliver is her latest book of poems and a particular favorite of mine since I have a great affinity for dogs! Oliver captures the special relationship between dogs and their owners. Two other works by Mary Oliver that are equally wonderful are, A Thousand Mornings and Why I Wake Early.”


The Ever Delightful Pat S has just finished The Secret of Raven Point by Jennifer Vanderbes.  Here’s what she is thinking.  “While never a fan of book about war, here is one that took me by surprise. Part coming-of-age, part mystery and part wartime saga, The Secret of Raven Point by Jennifer Vanderbes is an illustration of what war does to people both the good and bad. Opening at the start of World War II in a sleepy South Carolina town, Tuck Defresne enlists to the sorrow of his devoted younger sister Juliet. When after a short time, Tuck is declared MIA, Juliet takes a crash course in nursing and gets shipped to Italy where he was last seen.   This is where the novel really takes off. In the little covered Italian Front, Juliet is faced with the raw facts of war, the daily insanity littered with broken bodies and broken minds that constitute the Front Lines. In the course of Juliet's search for Tuck, she comes to know a Private brutalized as much by his comrades as by the enemy; a minister who must redefine his moral compass as decreed by the idiotic rules of war; and a doctor who must maintain his faith in his own ability against overwhelming odds. Vanderbes does an excellent job of creating a world where there is no black and white, just the very real and very raw desire to survive.


Jeanne is still just doing one thing, and I cannot deny what a worry this is to me.  It should worry you too. “I am listening to The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown. True to the reviews, if you liked Unbroken you will also like The Boys. But the latter stresses the necessity of teamwork more and Joe Rantz came from a very tough background, with nothing and no one, but his own resources and strong will. How can he fit in as a member of an elite crew at the University of Washington? The story moves slowly at first, but Edward Hermann is a terrific narrator with a voice that will keep you listening. “

Steph is also listening this week! “This week on my mini-road trip I listened to the audiobook of P.S. Be Eleven, a middle grade novel written by Rita Williams-Garcia and narrated by Sisi Aisha Johnson.  I’ve wanted to read it since it won the Coretta Scott King Award earlier this year, and when I saw the ACD on display I knew the time was right! (See, our displays even work on librarians.) This book is the sequel to One Crazy Summer, which won the Newbery Honor, but it’s not necessary to have read that book to try this one. It is a fantastic historic novel set in Bed-Stuy in the late 60s, and follows the story of sixth-grader Delphine as she settles back into her life after spending a summer with her Black Panther activist mother in Oakland. Her year involves a lot of transitions: becoming a sixth-grader, her first school dance, the introduction of the Jackson 5 and saving money to go to their concert at Madison Square Garden, her pa getting married, and her uncle coming back from Vietnam with a lot of pain. As a result, the book goes back and forth from mundane to serious issues remarkably well, with Delphine’s strong voice at the center of it all. Williams-Garcia’s writing is just spectacular, bringing history to life with simple flourishes. This ought to be required reading for all Brooklyn tweens and teens, because it is such a great snapshot of its time and place. Johnson gives even more vividness to Delphine with great narration and impeccable voice acting that evokes, rather than a cast of characters, a twelve-year-old’s perception of that cast of characters. This was a great acting choice for the book, and the hours of my drive flew by as Delphine told me her story. I can’t recommend it highly enough!


I have to drive once a week.  It makes me miserable but it’s something that must be done.  Monday’s ride to my Monday night commitment was especially brutal.  How does it take a human 40 minutes to get from here to Westport?  Happily I had Selected Shorts as my companion.  As we discussed last week, I have Commitment Issues.  While it is a serious problem where DVDs are concerned, it goes double for Books on CD.  My fellow commuters swear by them but I am too scattered to devote attention to a full blown book while I drive.  This is the genius of Selected Shorts.  For those of you who don’t know what this is, Selected Shorts is a program that is on every Saturday on WSHU at 3:00 and it matches great short stories with great readers who also happen to be great actors.  People like William Hurt, Parker Posey, and John Lithgow to name a few.  So while I can’t commit to a full blown novel, I can commit to a short story of 20 minutes or so in length.   The one that saved my sanity on Monday night was from the collection entitled (what else?) Behaving Badly, specifically the Stephen King story Popsy read by Michael Imperioli. The story line involves a gambling addict named Sheridan whose marker is coming due.  How does he pay them off?  By abducting young boys and selling them to a man named Mr. Wizard. But this time around Sheridan may have just picked the wrong kid to mess with.  This wonderful series is just perfect for those errands around town when you can’t face another minute of commercial radio. I can’t recommend them highly enough.

DJ Jazzy Patty McC is also listening!  And as we said at the start, the message that she received was not really what she was expecting, but it was welcome just the same. Here is her take on the week. “I seem to be a bit stuck in my feminist leanings from last week.  Might it have something to do with the Paycheck Fairness Act? Or maybe it was the negative media attention given to Hillary Clinton and her impending status as a grandmother? Or maybe it was the lingering negativity directed at United States Senator Feinstein accused of being emotional on issues of torture? I’d say it’s all of the above.  During this time of my own angsti-ness, my dear Wunder-Jen asked if I had heard the song ‘Water Fountain’ by tUnE-yArDs. Indeed, I had and I like it. I like it a lot. Merrill Garbus was interviewed recently by Pitchfork and was asked how she came by her new shift in sound. She replied that she walked into a public library and checked out the book, ‘How to Write a Hit Song’ by Molly-Ann Leikin. Well, now this spoke directly to me; musicians, how-to books and public libraries? Stop! The autodidact in me sang with joy. Then I began to reflect on what I considered a disservice to my Sisters by underrepresenting them last week on the playlist. It bothered me, it did. So this week I bring you, Women Who Will Rock Your World! Now let’s get to work on the rest of those misogynistic notions. Note: The entire album ‘Nikki Nack’ by tUnE-yArDs won’t be released until May 6th but you can listen to ‘Water Fountain’ now. Jen and I give it two big thumbs up. I sense a summer hit song/album. “

Nice New Book Goodness!

Selected by Jen
Selected by Jen

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

I feel I should tell you this right off the bat.  We are not playing with this whole winter reappearance thing.  It is just wrong that my car can be covered not only with pollen, but snow and ice too. If I am going to have allergy issues, it should at least be warmish out there.  Babs B and I are still committed to maintaining the bare leg policy.  And now, Erin has joined the sisterhood and is bare legging it too.  I have foresworn the winter coat and don’t want to see it again until maybe November.   Sweet Ann has decorated the Egg Tree and is ready for Sunday.  Even Sally has declared that she is only wearing spring colors from here on out.  The message hung outside the SoNo Loft says, “Long Live the Fighters” so it would appear that they would be with us if they knew we existed.    So won’t you join us in solidarity?  Declare it spring and it will be so!  Don’t let the cold, the snow, the sleet and the rest win.  It’s spring already!  This week we have a dead doctor, winner! winner! chicken dinner!, some disappointment,  spies,  Boris!, and an Oscar winner. The Playlist?  It’s here too.


Let us begin!


Sweet Ann has just finished A Circle of Wives by Alice LaPlant. “This is a murder mystery with quite a twist. What makes this novel different is that the victim is married to three women. Dr. John Taylor, a renowned plastic surgeon, is found dead in a Palo Alto hotel.  Dr. Taylor and his wife Deborah are not happy after their thirty years together. But rather than divorce and lose her social standing, she comes up with this crazy idea to keep her husband happy and her marriage intact. She has helped him find two other wives who do not know that he is married.  MJ is a hippie type with quite the past, Helen is a renowned children's oncologist and there might be another woman no one knows about.  This was a fun read.  I also enjoyed Ms. LaPlante's previous novel, Turn of Mind which told the story of a woman suffering from Alzheimer's who is being investigated for the murder of her best friend.”


Barbara M is asking questions. “What would do if you won 18.5 million Euros in the lottery? That’s the dilemma the protagonist in My Wish List by Gregoire Delacourt faces. Although it seems like a simple problem, it isn’t really; the consequences are life changing.  Jocelyne and her husband of twenty-one years live a rather mundane life in a small town in France. Their children are grown, she runs a fabric shop and he works as a manager in a factory. When she wins the lottery she decides to tell no one except her elderly father who, after having had a stroke forgets everything every six minutes.  What she does instead is make a list of how she could spend the money. This is a delightful little novel about change and choice. ”


Virginia the Tall Cool Texan is bemoaning a lack of substance. “When I first started The Divorce Papers by Susan Rieger, I was really hopeful it was going to be one of those fun chick lit books that just begs to be read on the beach.  Unfortunately, it didn’t live up to its potential.  Sophie, the main character, is a promising young criminal attorney who gets roped into handling a complicated divorce for the daughter of the firm’s top client.  Begrudgingly she takes the case and while her criminal-law approach to the divorce wins accolades from the client and the partners, it leads to tension in the office.  To add to her stress, handling a divorce has made her question the choices she has made in her personal life. Written as a series of emails, memos and lots of legal materials, the story ends up getting lost in too much legalese.  Don’t get me wrong, I have a fondness for the epistolary style of writing and the author showed promise, but if you were to subtract all of the pure legal jargon (most of which you end up skimming) you really have only enough substance for a short story. 


Steph is here this week to tell us about an interesting author mash-up. “Last weekend I read Decoded by Mai Jia and loved it. Jia is one of China’s most famous novelists, but this is his first book translated into English. It’s a fantastic quasi-spy thriller/historic novel of cryptology and genius. The combination means that fans of Amy Tan and John le Carre will find something to enjoy in this one!”


Jeanne is here with only one thing this week.  But, I must say that she is very excited about it.  “Even if you have already read The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, you must listen to it on audio. I borrowed it through Overdrive and David Pittu is BRILLIANT as the young and older troubled Theo Decker, his nerdy friend Andy Barbour, his crazy, but loyal Russian friend, Boris and his savior and extraordinary antiquarian, James ‘Hobie’ Hobart. There are many more characters that Pittu gives voice to in an authentic, entertaining manner that enriches Tartt's fascinating story of losses, loves and deceit in the art and antiques world as lived in New York City, but also Las Vegas, Amsterdam and Maine.”


I always have the best of intentions.  Truly.  But as my sons will tell you, the DVDs that I usually bring home become coasters for my evening wine and are never even opened.  In fact, son Thomas greets all instances of DVDs appearing at home with a requisite eye roll, a voice tinged with disgust and the following statement, ‘Great.  Another DVD we won’t watch.’  That being said, Barbara M recently pressed one into my hands, insisted I bring it home and actually watch for a change. And so I recently had the great pleasure of watching Twenty Feet from Stardom which won the Oscar for best documentary.  Twenty Feet brings us into the world of backup singers and their very complicated and fraught relationship with fame. I loved the Bruce Springsteen piece in the beginning of the film where he states that the ‘20 feet walk to the spotlight can be complicated.’ Of course it can!  Not all of us want the spotlight.  A whole lot of us are very content to be twenty feet away from the spotlight doing what we do.  But imagine if you will what the Stone’s Gimme Shelter would sound like without the amazing vocals of Merry Clayton.   Hardly the same song I would imagine.  You really come to admire these ladies and I guarantee that you will be in awe of their gifts.    Barbara was right. Take this one home and play it.


DJ Jazzy Patty McC is here with The Playlist and some thoughts on one of my favorite Rites of Spring: the reappearance of Mad Men.  I do love me some Roger Sterling. “So I gave up watching Mad Men due to my own issues. Yes, it’s a wildly popular TV show. Yes, those things really happened. I just couldn’t get over my own reaction to the sexism that was played out in every episode.  Does this make me any less a feminist? I’d like to think not. Then my sweet partner pointed out the number of men vs. women on my playlist this week given the era. I balked, choked, spit, sputtered and showed him the women on the playlist. He was right. There were a disproportionate number of men vs. women. I grew up in the Motor City.  I know music. I do. But I’d missed out on some great women who were sharing their voice. This week may we all find our voice as women, men, individuals and people who might otherwise need help finding it.     Now, rock on ladies…

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

Spring is suddenly everywhere we look and we are all out there staking our claim. Like the swallows to Capistrano, and the buzzards to Hinckley Ohio, the osprey’s have returned to their summer home over at the police station.  The pansies are out next door and across the street and I have seen the eight man shells out on the Norwalk and Saugatuck rivers from my train.  What is probably the ultimate sign that we are hurtling into spring, The Traveling Companion is with the rest of his Writing Brethren at Augusta reporting on his 29th (!)  Masters.  I suspect he must have felt a bit like Dorothy leaving behind the gray of Kansas and stepping into Technicolor Munchkin Land. Erin is rocking the seersucker and she has stated that she refuses to wear her winter coat anymore. As for myself, I have committed to the Bare Leg. Not so much because it’s spring, it is more that I am down to one pair of hose and I just can’t face buying more.  So there’s that. And the fact that I hate wearing hose, and that Babs B. started the Bare Leg  earlier this week.  I figure if Babs says it is fine to do so, then it is so. This week we have a road trip, a spooky mystery, donations of a kind, some flawed humans (are there any other kind?), April in Paris, a marriage, and the love of books. And really? A weekend without The Play List?  Not happening.


Let us begin!

Nice New Book Goodness!

Selected by Jen
Selected by Jen

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

New DVD Releases

Here is what you can find new to the shelves in the upcoming days.

You Are What You Read!

Hosted by Jen Dayton
Hosted by Jen Dayton

This week has been totally schizophrenic has it not?  Monday morning’s  soul crushing snow and cold which gave way to an afternoon full of sun and warm breeze, the beauty of yesterday (have we seen anything like that since October?  I don’t think so!) and then today cold spitting rain.  It’s April and my boy T.S. Eliot was not lying when he called it the ‘cruelest month’.  I don’t know about you but I found myself literally chasing sun this week.  Whenever it was out, so was I and I was amazed at how it elevated my mood and outlook.  The People of the Weather say that this Sunday is going to be amazing while the beginning of the week will be a sodden sorry mess which I suppose gives credence to the whole April showers, May flowers thing, so I charge everyone with the following task:  Go outside and play.  Take a walk, plant a pansy, visit the beach and report back. I promise you that you will be amazed at how good you will feel.  This week we have lots of things, some midlife, a couple for the ages, hoarding, tension, the reappearance of Jeanne, an amazing debut novel, and what would Friday be without The Playlist?

Let us begin!

Barbara M is showing her gathering skills this week.  “I absolutely love Cool Tools: A Catalog of Possibilities by Kevin Kelly.  A Thank You to Lois for bringing this book to my attention. It is a modern version of The Whole Earth Catalog filled with solutions to things you never knew you needed solutions for. I’ve already bought one to give as a gift. It’s filled with things I never knew I needed: a JarPop easy jar opener, E.A.R. foam earplugs, a Black and Decker Accu Mark Level. It’s a catalog and so much more with helpful advice like how to keep track of your books and which seat to choose on an airline. It’s an encyclopedia of useful and useless facts, objects and sites guaranteed to keep you glued to your computer for hours and hours.”

Sweet Ann is reading a book that has rapidly become a darling of the Reader’s Advisory Department, The Yellow Eyes of Crocodiles by Katherine Pancol.  “This is a French novel which was translated into English but anyone can relate to it.  The characters in this story are dealing with job loss, infidelity, disgruntled teenage children and other midlife issues. The story centers on Josephine whose husband leaves her to raise crocodiles in Africa with his mistress.  She and her two daughters are devastated and the eldest, Hortense is angry at her mother for her father leaving.  Josephine's life becomes more complicated when her sister convinces her to go along with a crazy scheme. This is a light, enjoyable read that will make you smile.  I think this book is a great way to welcome spring or bring to the beach in a couple of months.”

Miss Elisabeth of the CL spent a pleasant 117 minutes this week with one of my personal favorites. “I actually squealed with glee when I saw it: The Long Hot Summer is streaming on Netflix! This is one of my all-time favorite movies. The chemistry between Paul Newman and his future wife, Joanne Woodward, is so crackling it leaps off the screen. They play characters that embody the archetypes we saw them as: Newman is the drawling, gorgeous outsider with a heart of gold and charisma aplenty, while Woodward is an ice queen with a molten core. I think it’s one of the sexiest movies (with no sex!) ever produced. The script was based on two William Faulkner short stories, one of which, Barn Burning, can be found in The Art of the Short Story in the Literature section, or on audio in Collected Stories.  This is a must-see, and it’s very rarely available on streaming sights, so watch it while you can! “

Virginia the Tall Cool Texan is heeding my advice.  Good Girl Virginia! “Having never read E.L. Doctorow, I was on the verge of picking up his new book, Andrew’s Brain when Jen made the recommendation to first try an earlier work of his, Homer & Langley.  I am so glad I did because I just loved the book.  This novel is based on the infamous New York hoarders, Homer and Langley Collyer. Doctorow takes considerable historical liberties by extending the brothers’ lifespans and exploring their inner lives.  It is well-written, interesting, fun but at the same time absolutely tragic when you realize these two men had real lives with serious problems that in the end destroyed them.”

Steph is reporting back from last week. “To complete my report on The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara: Wow! I loved it. I like nothing more than being surprised by a book, and this book surprised me on multiple fronts. Yanagihara is a spectacular writer. What’s impressive beyond her obvious ability, though, is her ability to write in the pompous voice of a horrible person while simultaneously skewering that person. Further, though she builds up tension so subtly that I’m not sure I’d be able to expect it on a re-read.  This tension builds to the point of near breath-holding in the final sections. I only wish I had read it sooner.”

Jeanne has been quiet these past weeks.  A little too quiet if you ask me.  Here is what she’s been up to. “I have been busily reading 2014 Nutmeg nominees to get ready for Nutmeg @ Night and trying to catch up to the fantastic four Children’s Librarians. Maybe that won’t happen, but I am having so much fun trying. My current favorites are The Candymakers by Wendy Mass and Closed for the Season by Mary Downing Hahn.  I have also been listening via Overdrive and Hoopla so here is my audiobook playlist. I absolutely loved A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra. The narrator, Colette Whitaker was perfect and the story, while a tragedy in the very recent past, was compelling with great characters and fantastic dialogue. I enjoyed Divergent and Insurgent by Victoria Roth and read by Emma Gavin.  One of our esteemed colleagues says this is cookie cutter dystopia, but if you haven’t read the other cookies, who cares? I tried The Art of Hearing Heartbeats by Jan-Philip Sendker and I am not sure if it was the narrator, Cassandra Campbell or the story, but I abandoned that about half way through.  I went on to listen to Orange is the New Black: My Year in A Women’s Prison by Piper Kerman; also narrated by Cassandra Campbell. It is a memoir of the author’s time in Danbury’s Federal Correctional Institution.  She served several years of time after doing something very stupid and illegal while a student at Smith. I thought Campbell was a perfect voice for the author and the many different inmates that Kerman meets.  I am currently hitting PLAY on The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt and read by David Pittu. This book has gotten a lot of great press and I have high hopes.”

I am totally in love with Flying Shoes by Lisa Howorth.  This debut novel, based on the author’s life has me savoring each and every sentence.  Mary Byrd Thornton is a matron of a certain age living her life in a Mississippi college town when the phone rings one morning. It’s the police telling her that she and her family will need to go back to her childhood home in Virginia because they have cracked the long cold case of what happened to her nine-year-old stepbrother back in 1966.  The writing is rich and descriptive and just downright darkly funny in a way that it seems only southern writers can be.  This one comes out in June and I am buying lots of it. 

DJ Jazzy Patty McC has left The State Up North this week for the Wrong Coast.  While I am sure that this is an improvement in climate, I am not sure that it is an improvement in general.  “This week I boarded a Boeing 767 headed for Los Angeles to enjoy a respite of sorts, an opportunity to relax, catch up with friends, soak up some sunshine and perhaps bury my feet in the sand. What I hadn't planned for was spending 4.5 hours seated with a man who was violently ill the majority of the flight. Let's just say that there were not enough plastic bags to contain the fluids or prevent it from hitting the deck. I'm giving myself a reboot. Right now I'm sitting on my cabana balcony overlooking a work of art by David Hockney in the swimming pool. Foster the People just shot their video here yesterday for their new song Best Friend and today the radio world will descend on the hotel for the Worldwide Radio Summit. I think I'm going to get in the car, drive out to Santa Monica, dig my toes into the sand, soak up some rays and listen to some tunes. This just might be the reset button I need. So today, find your reset button, push play and chase after some sunshine. I'd be willing to bet it will put a little spring into your step.”

New DVD Releases

Here is what you can find new to the shelves in the upcoming days.

Nice New Book Goodness!

Selected by Jen
Selected by Jen

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

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