YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

This week’s offerings bring us a precocious lad, an Empress, a type of obsession or perhaps an obsession of type, a little sweetness, a little murder, a little love and the end of the world.


Let us begin!


Pat T. reports that “In anticipation of seeing the newly released movie Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close I have just started reading the book by Jonathan Safran Foer. The story is about a young boy's loss when his father dies in the World Trade Towers on September 11th and his search throughout New York City to unlock the clues of a key his Dad left behind. The young boy is smart, precocious and his quest is an outlet for dealing with his grieve and loss.”


Barbara M. is “reading Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman, Robert Massie’s wonderful biography and I’m loving it so far.”


Abby says, “Before reading Just My Type by Simon Garfield, I had a passing interest in fonts and design.  Now, I have a mild obsession.  Type is everywhere.  One man who tried to live a day without Helvetica ended up having to become a recluse with no access to media or mass transportation to avoid the omnipresent font.  The histories of some fonts are filled with scandal and thievery, as in the case of when IKEA changed its signage and catalog font from Futura to Verdana, tempers flared.  One downside to this book: I now have a hard time selecting fonts due to the added burden of knowing more about them.  Show me a list of fonts, and over thinking sets in following by brief decision-making paralysis.  A very fun read!”

The Lovely and Delightful Priscilla has enjoyed a recent staff favorite The Good American by Alex George she feels that, “This is a sweet story of Frederick and his wife Jette immigrating to America at the turn of the last century.  It made me laugh and cry.”

Marianne
weighs in with A Lonely Death by Charles Todd. “This American mother-son writing team has a lock on the British police procedural especially dealing with the aftermath of WWI.  This is their 13th novel featuring Scotland Yard Inspector, Ian Rutledge who himself has to cope with PTSD and the relentless voice in the back of his head.  Once again, this book kept me glued right up to the last page.”


Asha is reading something relatively normal.  “I'm listening to Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James and it is fantastic! I adore Pride and Prejudice, so it is nice being able to revisit characters that I have come to know and love. “


I am really loving The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker. This is not the sort of thing I enjoy normally,  but Walker's way with a story has me hooked!   Julia is an 11 year old who is not only navigating the rocky way of adolescence but the fact that the world has slowed its spin and is dying.  Walker is an amazing writer who totally remembers what it feels like to on the cusp of something big and can totally imagine something big we can only hope would never happen.  This one comes out in June.


Have a great weekend!

 

Priscilla and Asha’s MUOMS Picks

Priscilla and Asha’s MUOMS Picks
Priscilla and Asha’s MUOMS Picks

 Priscilla's Picks

A Good American by Alex George. A sweet story of Frederick and Jette immigrating to America. Family, Love, and a wonderful cast of charcters. Made me laugh and cry.

Navigating Traps & Maps by Maura Laughlin Carley (local author). Great handbook to help you find your way through health care issues and problems. Transitioning from one health care program to another.

Bomerang: Travels in The New Third World  by Michael Lewis. The credit boom told country by country. Mr. Lewis delves into the culture of each country and how differently each came to embrace this phenomenon. I found it hilarious but sad.

 

Asha's Picks

"Perfect Host". Perception is not always reality, that being said you should probably be careful about the people who seem unassuming.  I found the movie to be disturbing but hilarious. I'm not sure what that says about my sense of humor.

Ed King by David Guterson. An interesting adaption of Sophocles' Oedipus Rex. Gutereson took a few liberties with the characters but I think it was fastastic. A new, and fresh take on the Oedipus saga.

Little Children by Tom Perotta.  I listened to the audiobook and the characters in this book were so unlikable, I could not relate to any of them but that does not take away from how wonderfully written the book is. 

 

 

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

This week’s offerings show us back in Paris (like we ever really leave), in the English countryside, enjoying a parody and the real thing, and a philosophical musing regarding leadership.

Let us begin!

Barbara M. reports that she is “plodding through The Greater Journey:  Americans in Paris  by David McCullough, about the Americans who ventured to Paris in the early 1800s.  It’s very informative but not an easy read.”

I am really enjoying The Orchid House by Lucinda Riley.  This is the perfect read for those of us waiting for the new Kate Morton to show up again.  Julia Forester, world famous concert pianist, has come back to Wharton Park, where her grandfather was the gardener in charge of the greenhouses, after a personal tragedy to heal.  She discovers an old diary and sets out to find out what really happened when Harry, a former heir to Wharton Park, married Olivia in the days before World War II.  This one while not in the catalog yet will be by the beginning of next week and it is due out on February 14th.

Citizen Asha says, I just started Option$: the Secret Life of Steve Jobs by Daniel Lyons. It’s a fascinating, and irreverent parody on the life of Steve Jobs. I’m a fan.

Pat T. reports that she is “Continuing with Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson and I am enjoying the biography about this multi-faceted man. Jobs was a man of contradictions - on a personal level he was Zen like in his life style, yet his business dealings were with multimillion dollar corporations. “  

Pat S. spins it this way:” I cannot say enough how much I (unexpectedly) enjoyed Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson.The surprise is the history of Silicon Valle-while it was becoming Silicon Valley! Every company name, CEO, and mover and shaker in the industry is easily recognized and remembered. Oddly enough, it took much of the 'mystery' out of the myth of Silicon Valley. For those of us of 'a certain age' it is like a companion piece to ones' professional life.  As to Jobs himself, he is really no more than a misanthrope-albeit a brilliant one. However, no tears were shed for what some might refer to as his 'untimely' passing. Issacson did an outstanding job-on all accounts.”

 Priscilla muses on the following: Catherine the Great : Portrait of a Woman by Peter Massie is a wonderful read. So many women during this period were running countries and we have not had a woman president yet?

Indeed!

Have a great weekend!

Caroline and Sally's MUOMS Picks

Caroline and Sally
Caroline and Sally

Sally's Picks

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in an Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo: A deep look into the lives of the  families of Annawadi, a slum city on a half-acre abutting the Mumbai airport. It brings a new level of meaning to the concepts of hope and courage. Highly recommended.

The House at Tyneford  by Natasha Solomons: For those who can't get enough of Downton Abbey, a wonderful story of a young Viennese woman forced to leave her glamourous life in Austria and become a parlor maid at Tyneford House.

The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides: A rich story about the intertwining lives of three students at Brown University in the early 1980s, filled with the requisit existential soul-searching of the times. This is one of our picks for our Spring Book Discussion Series.

 

Caroline's Picks

This Beautiful Life by Helen Schulman: A disturbingly realistic story of a wealthy family living in New York City.  The teenage son, Jake, is at an exclusive private school when he is emailed an explicit video from a girl and forwards it to a friend, who forwards it to a friend, and the video goes viral.

Molto Batali: Simple Family Meals from My Home to Yours by Mario Batali: Mario's newest cookbook, divided into months rather than courses for seasonal cooking.  Each month features a couple dishes (usually pasta, his specialty), and then includes one whole meal from appetizers to dessert.  Accessible and enjoyable family style recipes - and Mario is hilarious!

No Angel by Penny Vincenzi: The first book of a trilogy, set in London, which starts right before World War I.  If you may be stuck inside during a snowstorm in the near future, or on a beach this summer, you should definitely pick this up.  Especially if you like Downton Abbey, because it's the same world.  One of her newer books, The Best of Times is also a great page turner.

Louise and Alan's MUOMS Picks

Alan and Louise
Alan and Louise

 Louise's Picks

"Moneyball" DVD starring Brad Pitt: A story about Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland A's who changed baseball by using computer generated analysis to find undervalued players.  Oakland won a record 20 games in a row with the smallest payroll in baseball in 2002 and changed the industry forever. Based on the book by Michael Lewis.

Catherine the Great by Robert Massie: Massie is a biographer with the instincts of a novelist according to the New York Times Book Review. Catherine  was the longest ruling female leader of Russia ( ruling from 1762-1796). Her rule was considered the Golden Age of the Russian Empire, and a period of enlightenment.

Jerry Thomas' Bartender Guide: My personal copy printed from the Espresso Book Machine. First published in 1862.  Cocktails are enjoying a huge revival, and some of the best cocktail books are reprints of old guides. Available from EBM for $8.99. Please contact On Demand Books for information about the Espresso Book Machine.

 

Alan's Picks

Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson:  This biography of Steve Jobs was released immediately after his death, and Isaacson does an extraordinary job of presenting the dual sides of Jobs’ personality: the modern-day Edison redefining technology used by millions, and strong personality who cared only what he thought and who was someone you either liked or loathed. Well-written and researched, a definitive treatment of an American icon. 

Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman:  Daniel Kahneman, a psychologist and Princeton professor, won the Nobel Prize for Economics for his ground-breaking studies of how we think, and how our brains make decisions, sometimes rapidly, sometimes stupidly. This is a book of insights, with great examples of how we think and why we should be careful about the decisions we make. Far and away one of the best books of the year. 

Willpower by Baumeister and Tierney: Baumeister is one of the world experts on how the mind works with respect to decision-making, and his focus here is how you exercise willpower. Two points to think about: you only have so much willpower, and if you burn it out during the day making decisions, you’ll not have it later, and are likely to just go with the flow. So spend it carefully on important decisions. And guess what? Exercising willpower burns up energy in your brain, and when it burns out, you can get your brain back up to speed to make a few more good decisions by taking in a few pieces of candy, or something with sucrose. Yup, a piece of chocolate to the rescue!

 

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

After a brief Helliday Hiatus we are back!  This week’s offerings include a William T. Sherman reference, a happily married woman looking forward to getting to know a man who is not her husband, some recklessness, alternative history, and some deaf people.


Let us begin!


Barbara M reports that, “I'm late to the show I know but I'm finally readingUnbroken by Laura Hillenbrand and it's a riveting piece of World War II history. So far, war is hell.”


Pat T says, “Along with many other readers, I was ‘gifted’ the new biography of Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson for Christmas and have just started this long read on cold winter nights! I am looking forward to better understanding this multi-faceted man who revolutionized our world with his technology innovations.


Jeanne who is finally back with us after a rather unfortunate spill weighs in with the following: “ I read and enjoyed A Good Hard Look - Ann Napolitano. Set in Flannery O'Connor's hometown of Midgeville, Ga, she plays a part in the rather sad, but hopeful cast of characters who were looking for happiness, but found tragedy as a result of their reckless but human actions. This was well-scripted; artfully drawn characters and landscape.

Abby has moved away from a Swedish Mystery and asks us the following:   “If you were given the key to change history, would you?  Should you? 11/22/63 by Stephen King  explores that question in regards to the assassination of John F. Kennedy.  Love him or hate him, how would the butterfly effect have impacted our country had Oswald's bullet missed it's mark?  This exploration was a fun and interesting read.”

I am loving Burn Down the Ground by Kambri Crews so much so that I keep almost missing my train stops!  Kambri and her brother were hearing children born to deaf parents.  Her mother was smart, beautiful and kind.  Her father was a bad boy with a bad temper.  A very bad temper.  Such a bad temper that the book begins with Kambri visiting her father in prison.  This is a fascinating look at two very different worlds; the hearing and the Deaf.  

Have a great weekend!

 

Darien Library's Top 20!

 

It's that time of year when everyone picks their favorites of the year and we are no exception.  Here is what we have loved this year.   We have multiple copies of these and encourage you to come and visit us for something wonderful.  Have a lovely Holiday!

Here's what's new in Books this week!

Here are some new titles to tempt you!

Here is what's new in books this week!

Here is what is coming in just in time for the long Holiday Weekend!

 

New Fiction for the week of 11/14/11

Here is what you can expect to find on the shelves next week. 

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