Nice New Book Goodness

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

You Are What You Read!

To start this week, we give a shout out to Amy C, True Library Friend and our Beloved Board President, who brought us caramels from the spot where she Summers in Montana!  They were EPIC and worth every calorie.  Thanks AmyI have come to the sad realization that I can fight the March of Autumn only so long before even I have to surrender.  The Autumnal Equinox arrives on Monday at 10:29; so officially this is the last weekend for the Summer of 2014. A more beautiful summer I don’t think I have ever seen.  I don’t know about you all but I marvel at how swiftly fall is taking over.  The golden quality of sunlight, the way it’s  getting darker earlier, that bite in the morning air, even the green of the leaves is starting to have that muted characteristic of impending change.  At the Farmer’s Market this week there were still beautiful tomatoes and corn to be had, but there were also plenty of fall squashes, pumpkins, mums, newly dug potatoes, lovely crisp apples and pears. This morning on the train platform I was in the minority with my sleeveless dress and bare leg.  All around me were tweeds and boots and sweaters.  They looked much more comfortable than I felt. So I officially yield to fall and I wish it a long glorious reign because just the thought of winter returning is killing me.  This week we have knife throwing, Queens, (but not Knife Throwing Queens. Sorry), Wonder Woman, some Grand Duchesses, London, The Street and a Boston Girl. You want a soundtrack with all that?  Done!  In fact we are giving you two!

Let us begin!

Miss Elisabeth of the CL is still talking about what she did while Away.  “While I was on vacation, I read 6 adult books, mostly light beach reads and detective thrillers. By far the best one was a brand new book by Chelsea Cain, One Kick. The beginning of a new mystery series, this was a nail-biting suspense novel with the type of heroine you can’t help but root for. When she was six, Kick Lannigan was kidnapped from her front yard.  When she was 11, Kick was accidently rescued by the FBI. Now she’s 21, and she’s spent the past ten years making sure she knows how to keep herself safe: martial arts, sharp shooting, knife throwing skills, and lock-picking are among her many talents. Her quiet, safe life is forever altered when she is drawn into the investigation of two recent child abductions with eerie similarities to her own. I literally could not put this book down. I read it on the plane, and was so engrossed in the story I didn’t notice we were landing until I felt the plane bump the ground! If you like suspenseful mysteries, One Kick is a great pick. “

Barbara M loves herself a Seriously Sad Story.  Here is her latest pick.  “When I started reading We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas I thought it would be an updated version of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, a family saga of the Irish-American experience. In a way, it is an immigrant American family saga but it is so much more. It’s about unfulfilled dreams and how the early onset of Alzheimer’s disease can devastate a family. The book is the beautifully written story of Eileen, a child of Irish immigrants, who has aspirations of escaping her life in Woodside, Queens. When she marries Ed Leary, a promising scientist, she believes that her life will go as she planned. It doesn’t. A sad story exquisitely told.”

Mallory has been talking non-stop about her love for this book.  Seriously.  She won’t stop. Please someone else read this so she can have a Book Friend.  Thank you.  For those of you who want a head start, check out Darien Reads.  “The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore is part biography, part feminist history, part comic legacy, and my new go-to recommendation, so get used to hearing me blab about it.  William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman’s creator, was a man obsessed with truth and justice, surrounded by women who were crusaders during the suffragist and birth control movements of the early 1900’s.  He gets a degree in law, gets a degree in psychology, invents the lie detector, and basically fails at everything he attempts.  Marston marries his high school sweetheart and then takes on a secret live-in wife as well (the feminist Queen Margaret Sanger’s niece).  He has children with each woman and they all live together as one glorious oddball family in a little town called Darien, CT for a short period of time.  Marston imbues Wonder Woman with characteristics from the women he encounters and uses her as a radical agent for social change.  Wonder Woman was powerful, political, and her only weakness was being shackled by man; Marston’s Wonder Woman is my new personal hero. He states, ‘Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who, I believe, should rule the world.’ You’ll find The Secret History of Wonder Woman when it comes out in October, so place your holds now!”

The Fabulous Babs B just finished a book we are pretty wild for, The Romanov Sisters by Helen Rappaport.  Here’s what she thinks.  “This is the history of the four daughters of the tsar of Russia, Nicholas II.  They were the Princess Diana of their day and were much admired for their happy dispositions, their looks, the clothes they wore and their privileged life style.  The girls lived in virtual isolation, their only freedom being when they traveled, usually on the Royal Yacht.  I found it sad that they were constantly surrounded by armed guards.  I also learned that Alexandra, the girl's mother, suffered with numerous health issues throughout her life which severely restricted her lifestyle.  I was drawn to the great love and devotion the Romanovs felt for each other, despite living through the harshest of circumstances. “

Pat S has just finished Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home by Nina Stibbe. “Back in the early 80's, Nina, a young dropout from rural England, decides to try her luck at being a nanny in London. She joins the bohemian household of single mom Mary Kay Wilmers (editor and owner of London Review of Books) and her sons Will and Sam Frears.   She finds herself in a rather rarefied literary world where one of the neighbors is the esteemed playwright Alan Bennett who drops in frequently for dinner, and the ex-husband is Stephen Frears the movie director. Nina does not recognize the names, nor is she impressed when told who they are. She is the anti-Mary Poppins (she neither cooks nor cleans), and fits in perfectly with this colorful, raffish crew. Over a period of the next several years, Nina recounts to her sister Victoria her daily routines and exchanges first as a nanny, and then as a returning university student in this enchanting, laugh out loud collection of letters.  After reading these delightful letters, it made me wonder what will become of the epistolary format now that no-one seems to write letters any longer.”

Here’s Steph and what she’s reading. “This weekend on my commute, I read Business Adventures by John Brooks. This is our selection for September’s Business Book Group, and came to most people’s attention after Bill Gates told an interviewer it was his favorite business book. To be honest, even though I usually like business books, I didn’t have high hopes for this one, because it seemed to be a bunch of random stories from twentieth-century Wall Street. I was so wrong! This book has been a delight. Brooks was a writer for The New Yorker, and each of these stories reads like the sort of article you cut out and pass along to a friend. Whether he’s explaining how a corner works (and what happened the last time someone tried to pull one off), or walking the reader through the growth of Xerox, his writing is funny and clear, and has something to offer both the business novice and the Wall Street expert. I’m really looking forward to discussing it on September 23.”

I must confess that I was not a huge fan of Anita Diamant’s book The Red Tent.  I have found that you either love this book, or you are in my camp:  Camp Pack-Up-Your-Tent-And-Go.  But when I heard her speak at a Library Preview at Simon and Schuster about her new book Boston Girl I was intrigued enough to give it a shot and I am glad I did.  Addie Baum is asked by her granddaughter the following question: “How did you get to be the woman you are today?”  Thus begins the story of 85-year-old Addie and her family living in the multi-cultural North End of Boston at the turn of the last century.   I must confess. I love this book and the voice of Addie Baum so much I almost missed my stop this week.  I think Book Groups would find plenty of meat to pick off the bones of this book and it comes out in December. 

It would seem that The State Which Shall Not Be Named is a place to avoid at all costs and not for the usual reasons.  Here’s DJ Jazzy Patty McC to explain why. “An uninvited guest arrived at our house last week. The cold, flu and virus season has officially moved in and I am feeling inhospitable. Our friends across the hall (he’s a surgeon and she’s an ER pediatric nurse) have assured me that we are not alone in the land of illness and quarantine. So this week, I’m going to keep things brief and to the point. Get a flu shot. Do it now. My autumnal equinox wish for you is that you have no uninvited guests. They’re hard to get rid of, they don’t want to leave and they don't clean up after themselves.”

DL LISTENING TO THE EQUINOX 2014

DL Fall into Change 2013

 

 

 

 


 

 

Meet Us On Main Street

Children's Librarians Claire Moore and Lisa Nowlain talk to Meet Us On Main Street about the books they are reading now.

New eBooks from 3M

Here are the new titles available from 3M.

Nice New Book Goodness

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

You Are What You Read!

First of all, a big thanks to Pamela M for the taffy from of all places, Alaska. Who knew one could Summer in Alaska?  Well, Pamela M did.  Thanks Pam!  I just need to say that I am holding fast to summer.  While I had to forsake the sandal this week because the Dayton 10 just got too cold, I am still working the white pants.  The Ever Fabulous Babs B is looking pointedly in the other direction pretending that fashion faux pas is not happening on her watch.   On Tuesday morning, I was mourning the fact that summer was indeed creeping away from me, that it was only 8:00 in the morning and everything I tried my hand at was epically failing, and that the week seemed to stretch way too long ahead.  It was a pity party for one and it wasn’t pretty.  And then I looked out the train window for this week’s message from The SoNo Loft.  And there it was, “You are what you read!”  It made me laugh out loud and then I am afraid I whooped.  My apologies to the man who was sitting next to me; if you are out there Sir, I swear I am mentally stable most of the time so there was no need to try to shrink into the window and away from me.  And just like that the day turned around and things did not seem so daunting.  So, a huge thank you to Think Around Corners and Greg C, the mad geniuses behind the message each week.  You all will never know how much I delight when the train is pulling into  the South Norwalk Station because of you! In their honor, go out of your way this weekend to gladden someone’s path and remember to thank those that gladden yours in ways big and small.  This week we have some Maine, devastation, cottage cheese containers, the G8, Australia, Burma, a bookstore, and some grieving elephants.   And, of course, from The State Which Shall Not Be Named we have The Playlist.

Let us begin!

Abby has turned to a favorite series this week with The Bone Orchard by Paul Doiron.  “A while ago I wrote about a mystery series by Paul Doiron featuring Maine State Game Warden Mike Bowditch.  I’m happy to report that Doiron’s latest, The Bone Orchard, is a highly enjoyable read which highlights his obvious love of the outdoors. I never like to reveal too much about a mystery, but I will say in book 4 of the series Mike must step outside his zone of comfort to come to the aid of his friend and mentor. I find Doiron’s writing has an effective and unique rhythm. He has a beautiful way of setting a scene and getting to the heart of his characters.”

Sweet Ann has just finished The Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami.  “Tsukuru was part of a close group of high school friends who did everything together.  After graduation, Tsukuru is the only one who chose to go to university away from where he and his friends live.  By the end of his sophomore year, his friends refuse to see him or answer his calls. This devastates him and he is never the same again.  It is as if all his joy in life is gone.  Sixteen years later, he meets a woman he would like to date.  On their first date she asks questions about his high school experience and for the first time he reveals his lost friendships.  As they continue to date, she says he must resolve his past before they can move forward. She then convinces him to return to his hometown to discover the reason for his exclusion. The story follows Tsukuru as he searches for life's meaning and redemption.  It is a wonderful read about image, friendship, loss and reconciliation.  “

Thomas S aka My Son is here with something he’s been reading in between his school assignments.  Please don’t call Social Services on me. I swear I did the best I could. “The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth is easily the best book I have read this summer, and probably one of the best YA novels I have ever read in my life. It deals with all of the wondrous teenage anxieties that come from living in a small town filled with evangelicalism, bigotry, and thinking that your ‘sinful behavior’ contributed to the deaths of your parents. The coping mechanisms the main character uses are fantastic: making a doll house filled with random cottage cheese containers and moss, and renting creepy David Bowie vampire flicks on VHS. Upon the conclusion of book two, I found myself crying in the corner while Brand New's Play Crack the Sky played on my stereo. It was a truly magical experience. “


Virginia, everyone’s favorite Tall Cool Texan, is back and she has been busy!  What up VA We missed you! “The past couple of weeks I lost many an hour to two of my favorite authors. I have some good news for fans of Lianne Moriarty and some bad news for fans of Lee Child.  Let’s start with the bad.  I love the Jack Reacher series.  I read the entire series last summer start to finish and was not disappointed.  I have waited a whole year to get my Jack Reacher fix and when I started reading Personal I found it very unsatisfying.   Reacher finds himself pulled back into the military to help stop an attack on the G8 Summit after a sniper tries to assassinate the French president.  The expertise of the marksman has led government and military intelligence to narrow the suspect pool down to a handful of individuals; one of which is a man who spent the last 15 years in jail thanks to Reacher.  The government has asked for Jack’s help in tracking the suspect down but are they using him as bait?  All of the elements were there, but something was missing.  Jack Reacher’s personality and idiosyncrasies were gone and the impossible escapades were toned down.  The best way I can describe it is to say it is Jack Reacher lite.  On the flip side, Liane Moriarty delivered big with Big Little Lies.  I love how Moriarty writes; her engaging tone makes you want to turn the page.  In her latest book, she continues her winning way  of writing from multiple women’s perspectives slowly revealing how their lives intersect.  Unlike The Husband’s Secret, her latest book is darkly humorous, but don’t worry. The story contains all of the twists and turns we anticipate from Moriarty.  The book starts with a tragic death during a parent’s night at a local elementary school in an affluent seaside community in Australia.  Moriarty then builds the story backwards, showing how three women, each at a crossroads in their life, played a role in the evening’s tragic ending.  I found it funny and thrilling with surprising depth.  It’s an absolutely wonderful read.” 


Pat T has finished the sequel to the Art of Hearing Heartbeats.  “The Well-Tempered Heart by Jan Philip Sendker follows Julia's story 10 years later.  She is a successful attorney at a crossroads in her life. One day, while preparing for a presentation, she hears the haunting voice of a wailing woman. Julia decides to return to her father's homeland of Burma to understand what she is hearing. With the help of her half-brother U Ba, they discover that it is the voice of a dead woman, Nu Nu, and together they learn the sad tale of Nu Nu's life.  In the search for answers, this becomes a journey of self-discovery for Julia, a stronger bond between brother and sister and of course a romance.”


Hello Steph!  What’s doin’?  “This weekend I read The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin. What a sweet and funny book! Fikry is a bookstore owner on a small island whose life has been going steadily downhill since his wife’s death, but the shocking discovery of a toddler abandoned in his bookstore changes his life quite a bit! A small mystery and a lovely romance round this out into a nice beach read for those who want to sneak in one more this year or alternatively if you’re already looking forward to fall, it would also be a pleasant fireplace read. This is perfect for fans of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry.”

 Erin, Steph,  and I were invited to a Very Fancy Author Dinner for Jodi Picoult this week.  As you all know I never, ever say no to talking books and I most surely never, ever say no to dinner; most especially a Fancy Dinner.  But frankly, I dreaded the whole idea of singing for my Fancy Author Dinner which was reading Jodi’s new book which is coming out October. The last book of hers that I had read and enjoyed was My Sister’s Keeper which came out in 2005.  That’s all I am going to say about that.  But, from the moment I picked Leaving Time, I remembered why I liked her back in the day.  Jenna is a thirteen-year-old girl whose mother Alice is a scientist who specializes in elephants; specifically elephants and how they grieve.  Alice has been missing for the majority of Jenna’s life and Jenna refuses to believe that she could be dead.  So she enlists the help of Serenity Jones, a formerly famous TV Psychic and Virgil Stanhope, an alcoholic private detective. The story is told in alternating voices but it is the voice of Alice and her field notes on the grieving rituals of elephants that make this so compelling.  This one is due out in October.

DJ Jazzy Patty McC has something to say from The State Up North. Will she be North enough to see this?  There has to be something worthy about living up there.   “This was a weird week in my world. I’m blaming the last full perigee moon of the year. Please don’t tell Neil deGrasse Tyson I said that. I know, I know correlation is not causation and if he found out it might make him cranky and nobody likes a cranky astrophysicist. I’m stuck in a few transitions. Back to school, summers’ nearing end, the beginning of one thing and the end of another. I am not ready to say goodbye to summer and we don’t officially have to do that until September 22nd. So, I still have my shorts, white jeans and one pair of flip-flops on hand. But I can resist the seasonal change for only so long before I’ll be forced to throw my hands up in surrender and shrug on a sweater or coat of some sort. So if you’re stuck in a transition of your own, it’s perfectly ok to sit there for a while. Look up at the sky, contemplate, reflect and move on when you are ready. Like the planets and stars above we operate on our own specific timetable of movement and change. And let’s face it, saying goodbye is something that is very, very hard to do.”

DL SEASON OF RESISTANCE, RESISTANCE IS FUTILE 2014

 

 

New eBooks from OverDrive

Here are the new titles available from OverDrive:

Children Act by Ian McEwan

Five Days Left by Julie Lawson Timmer

Neverhome by Laird Hunt

Robert B. Parker's Blind Spot by Reed Farrel Coleman

The Secret Place by Tana French

So We Read On:  How the Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures by Maureen Corrigan

The Angry Optimist: The Life and Times of John Stewart by Lisa Rogak

Barracuda by Christos Tsiolkas

The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

The Drop by Dennis Lehane

The Eye of Heaven by Clive Cussler

How Shall I Know You by Hilary Mantel

Murder 101 by Faye Kellerman

Personal by Lee Child

What I Know For Sure by Oprah Winfrey

New eBooks from 3M

Here are the new titles available from 3M.

Nice New Book Goodness

Here is what you can find on the shelves that is new next week. Come in and visit us, or put your items on hold from home! We will let you know when they are ready for you to pick up!

New DVD Releases

Here is what you can find new to the shelves in the upcoming days.

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