YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

This week’s offerings bring us a precocious lad, an Empress, a type of obsession or perhaps an obsession of type, a little sweetness, a little murder, a little love and the end of the world.


Let us begin!


Pat T. reports that “In anticipation of seeing the newly released movie Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close I have just started reading the book by Jonathan Safran Foer. The story is about a young boy's loss when his father dies in the World Trade Towers on September 11th and his search throughout New York City to unlock the clues of a key his Dad left behind. The young boy is smart, precocious and his quest is an outlet for dealing with his grieve and loss.”


Barbara M. is “reading Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman, Robert Massie’s wonderful biography and I’m loving it so far.”


Abby says, “Before reading Just My Type by Simon Garfield, I had a passing interest in fonts and design.  Now, I have a mild obsession.  Type is everywhere.  One man who tried to live a day without Helvetica ended up having to become a recluse with no access to media or mass transportation to avoid the omnipresent font.  The histories of some fonts are filled with scandal and thievery, as in the case of when IKEA changed its signage and catalog font from Futura to Verdana, tempers flared.  One downside to this book: I now have a hard time selecting fonts due to the added burden of knowing more about them.  Show me a list of fonts, and over thinking sets in following by brief decision-making paralysis.  A very fun read!”

The Lovely and Delightful Priscilla has enjoyed a recent staff favorite The Good American by Alex George she feels that, “This is a sweet story of Frederick and his wife Jette immigrating to America at the turn of the last century.  It made me laugh and cry.”

Marianne
weighs in with A Lonely Death by Charles Todd. “This American mother-son writing team has a lock on the British police procedural especially dealing with the aftermath of WWI.  This is their 13th novel featuring Scotland Yard Inspector, Ian Rutledge who himself has to cope with PTSD and the relentless voice in the back of his head.  Once again, this book kept me glued right up to the last page.”


Asha is reading something relatively normal.  “I'm listening to Death Comes to Pemberley by P.D. James and it is fantastic! I adore Pride and Prejudice, so it is nice being able to revisit characters that I have come to know and love. “


I am really loving The Age of Miracles by Karen Thompson Walker. This is not the sort of thing I enjoy normally,  but Walker's way with a story has me hooked!   Julia is an 11 year old who is not only navigating the rocky way of adolescence but the fact that the world has slowed its spin and is dying.  Walker is an amazing writer who totally remembers what it feels like to on the cusp of something big and can totally imagine something big we can only hope would never happen.  This one comes out in June.


Have a great weekend!

 

Give Peace (and Quiet) a Chance

What do Rosa Parks, Dale Carnegie, Albert Einstein, Steven Spielberg, Eleanor Roosevelt, J.K. Rowling, and Joe DiMaggio all have in common? Answer: They are all considered introverts. In fact, scientific research tells us that at least one in every three people is an introvert.

We often think of extroverts as the trailblazers: think of Oprah Winfrey, Winston Churchill, Martha Stewart, Muhammed Ali, and John F. Kennedy. However, the new book Quiet by Susan Cain tells us that the contributions of introverts have been equally important throughout history. Our world belongs to extroverts -- the prevailing culture of celebrity and social media in the US alone is a prime example. But there is an undercurrent that continuously pushes us forward through ideas and examples...quietly.

Susan Cain's book will appeal to those who crave the limelight as well as those who'd rather stay home and just read about it. As Gandhi, one of the famous introverts cited in the book, once said, "In a gentle way, you can shake the world."

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

This week’s offerings show us back in Paris (like we ever really leave), in the English countryside, enjoying a parody and the real thing, and a philosophical musing regarding leadership.

Let us begin!

Barbara M. reports that she is “plodding through The Greater Journey:  Americans in Paris  by David McCullough, about the Americans who ventured to Paris in the early 1800s.  It’s very informative but not an easy read.”

I am really enjoying The Orchid House by Lucinda Riley.  This is the perfect read for those of us waiting for the new Kate Morton to show up again.  Julia Forester, world famous concert pianist, has come back to Wharton Park, where her grandfather was the gardener in charge of the greenhouses, after a personal tragedy to heal.  She discovers an old diary and sets out to find out what really happened when Harry, a former heir to Wharton Park, married Olivia in the days before World War II.  This one while not in the catalog yet will be by the beginning of next week and it is due out on February 14th.

Citizen Asha says, I just started Option$: the Secret Life of Steve Jobs by Daniel Lyons. It’s a fascinating, and irreverent parody on the life of Steve Jobs. I’m a fan.

Pat T. reports that she is “Continuing with Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson and I am enjoying the biography about this multi-faceted man. Jobs was a man of contradictions - on a personal level he was Zen like in his life style, yet his business dealings were with multimillion dollar corporations. “  

Pat S. spins it this way:” I cannot say enough how much I (unexpectedly) enjoyed Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson.The surprise is the history of Silicon Valle-while it was becoming Silicon Valley! Every company name, CEO, and mover and shaker in the industry is easily recognized and remembered. Oddly enough, it took much of the 'mystery' out of the myth of Silicon Valley. For those of us of 'a certain age' it is like a companion piece to ones' professional life.  As to Jobs himself, he is really no more than a misanthrope-albeit a brilliant one. However, no tears were shed for what some might refer to as his 'untimely' passing. Issacson did an outstanding job-on all accounts.”

 Priscilla muses on the following: Catherine the Great : Portrait of a Woman by Peter Massie is a wonderful read. So many women during this period were running countries and we have not had a woman president yet?

Indeed!

Have a great weekend!

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

After a brief Helliday Hiatus we are back!  This week’s offerings include a William T. Sherman reference, a happily married woman looking forward to getting to know a man who is not her husband, some recklessness, alternative history, and some deaf people.


Let us begin!


Barbara M reports that, “I'm late to the show I know but I'm finally readingUnbroken by Laura Hillenbrand and it's a riveting piece of World War II history. So far, war is hell.”


Pat T says, “Along with many other readers, I was ‘gifted’ the new biography of Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson for Christmas and have just started this long read on cold winter nights! I am looking forward to better understanding this multi-faceted man who revolutionized our world with his technology innovations.


Jeanne who is finally back with us after a rather unfortunate spill weighs in with the following: “ I read and enjoyed A Good Hard Look - Ann Napolitano. Set in Flannery O'Connor's hometown of Midgeville, Ga, she plays a part in the rather sad, but hopeful cast of characters who were looking for happiness, but found tragedy as a result of their reckless but human actions. This was well-scripted; artfully drawn characters and landscape.

Abby has moved away from a Swedish Mystery and asks us the following:   “If you were given the key to change history, would you?  Should you? 11/22/63 by Stephen King  explores that question in regards to the assassination of John F. Kennedy.  Love him or hate him, how would the butterfly effect have impacted our country had Oswald's bullet missed it's mark?  This exploration was a fun and interesting read.”

I am loving Burn Down the Ground by Kambri Crews so much so that I keep almost missing my train stops!  Kambri and her brother were hearing children born to deaf parents.  Her mother was smart, beautiful and kind.  Her father was a bad boy with a bad temper.  A very bad temper.  Such a bad temper that the book begins with Kambri visiting her father in prison.  This is a fascinating look at two very different worlds; the hearing and the Deaf.  

Have a great weekend!

 

All is Merry and Bright

And shiny and new!

Come on down and check out our Best Books of 2011 display!

We ordered additional copies of our favorites from the  past year  and they are out and ready for you to take home for the Holiday weekend!

 

 

 

Here is what's new in books this week!

Here is what is coming in just in time for the long Holiday Weekend!

 

New Fiction for the week of 11/14/11

Here is what you can expect to find on the shelves next week. 

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ!!!

This week the Desketeers are remaining pretty true to form.  No big surprises this week.  I think we are still a tad waterlogged.

The offerings are as follows:  red, not pickled herrings, polygamy, a dabbling in a nasty business, an abandoned book, times gone by, and some healing.

Let us begin!

Abby wants to remind us all that “It's no secret I'm a fan of Scandinavian crime fiction and have really enjoyed Norwegian author Jo Nesbo's Detective Harry Hole series.  Headhunters is a standalone novel.  Roger Brown is the top corporate headhunter in Norway.  What he lacks in height he more than makes up for with ego, a sweet car, and exceptionally good hair.  Height is actually an obsession with him as it factors in strongly when considering job candidates and just about everything else. Roger has a lovely (tall) wife, and appears to have everything...except money to finance their lifestyle.  A smart fellow, he comes up with a risky way to keep him and his wife in the style they have become accustomed. There are lots of twists and turns in the story, which become a bit much.  In the end I felt Nesbo was somewhat self-congratulatory about what a clever writer he is to have come up with this plot.    It has some very nice Holy Cow moments along the way, but overall, a bit too many tricks and red herrings.”

 



Citizen Asha reports, “I am reading Love Times Three: Our True Story of a Polygamous Marriage. The book is about the Mormon family (Joe, Vicki, Valerie and Alina Darger) who inspired the HBO series Big Love. As a fan of the television show it was fascinating to read about the actual people, sadly it’s not as risqué and drama filled as the show. They live a fairly normal life; PTAs, minivans and blackberries which offers a different view of Mormonism. I just started reading Johannes Cabal: The Detective by Jonathan L. Howard. I am a major fan of Johannes Cabal. He is witty, cranky, arrogant, amoral and he also dabbles in necromancy but don’t hold it against it him. Cabal just wants to practice his experiments in peace and yet, he always finds himself in trouble. Apparently necromancy is not considered a proper way to make a living. Who knew?”

 


Barbara M. weighs in with the following: “I have done something I do not do easily. I just stopped reading The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht. What started as a somewhat interesting book turned into a very strange disjointed one two thirds through and so I abandoned it. I have just begun Still Alice by Lisa Genova about a woman experiencing early onset Alzheimer’s disease and it promises to be a more satisfying read. “

 

 

 

Pat T. has just  “finished listening to the audio book Rules of Civility by Amor Towles, and I would highly recommend this audio book because the narrator had the perfect voice for the book's main character, Katey Kontent. It is a good story that realistically depicts the era, styles, and the well-to-do and working singles of the late 1930s and early '40s just as the nation is coming out of the grips of the Depression into a robust manufacturing economy before World War II.”

 

 


I am in love with The Healing which is due out in February.  When the mistress of the plantation has a breakdown after her 12 year old daughter dies she takes in a new born slave baby and renames her Grenada.  Master Satterfield has not only his wife’s increasingly fragile mental state and opium addiction to worry about. Something is causing his field hands to die off in large numbers.  He buys Polly Shine who is a healer to help determine what can be done to halt the epidemic.  In Grenada, Polly recognizes a fellow healer and proceeds to apprentice her.  

Have a great weekend!


 

All things on earth point home in old October; sailors to sea, travellers to walls and fences, hunters to field and hollow and the long voice of the hounds, the lover to the love he has forsaken. Thomas Wolfe

Yes Tom.  October does bring out the nesting instinct in us all.  And what better to bring into the house as the nights get longer than some wood for a fire and some books to read?


This month we are looking forward to new works by 4 old favorites. 


The Very Picture of You by Isabel Wolff brings us the story of 35 year old  English portrait painter Ella Graham.  Ella’s gift is that she can see right away what makes a person unique and can then translate it onto canvas.  When her sister Chloe asks her to paint a portrait of her American fiancé Nate, Ella feels some hesitation at doing so.  Ella feels Nate and sister may not the right fit for each other.   As the portrait comes to life will Ella discover her hunch is correct or will some trick of light prove her wrong?  We loved Wolff’s first book A Vintage Affair and we are really looking forward to this one.


When She Woke is the newest offering from one of our favorite authors,  Hilary Jordan.  In this Dystopian retelling of The Scarlett Letter, Hannah Payne finds herself accused of murder.  The victim?  Her unborn child.  Her punishment?  She is now a Red .  Literally.  Hannah is red so that everyone will know her crime.   


 

 

 

In The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides asks the question, in this age of unromantic love brought about by pre-nups, sexual freedom and divorce can  a traditional love story or marriage plot survive?  Meet Madeline, the English Major, her boyfriend Leonard, the boy science genius, and Mitchell their friend with a strong interest in Christian mysticism who is convinced the Madeline is his romantic destiny.  It is the early 1980s and they have just graduate from Brown University ready to embark on their lives.  Over the next year they learn things and have experiences that will color their lives forever.  


 

Boomerang;  Travels in the New Thrid World  by Michael Lewis takes a hard look at the United State's financial crisis and its ripple effect on markets world wide.  We look forward to hearing his take on a rapidly changing reality.


 

 

Here’s to crisp cool days and falling leaves!

 

Really, Really Into the Wilder

 If you read and loved Laura Ingalls Wilders' autobiographical series years ago, The Wilder Life might feel like a book you could have written. Author Wendy McClure re-discovers her prized Little House books as an adult, awakening her own childhood spent reading the books and imagining herself in Laura's pioneer world.

Now firmly back under the spell, she and her ever-patient boyfriend drive to sites around the country where the Ingalls family homesteads once stood, encountering back-to-the-earth groups and some slightly over-focused internet fans who dissect the books, television series, and various spin-offs to an extreme. She attempts to churn butter and grind wheat for bread, and examines the politics between various fan factions: Team Mary vs. Laura's followers...the "official" vs. "family-approved" sites...fact vs. fiction...

Finally, she concludes that the Little House world has come full circle for her, and she puts everything back into perspective. It's a nice place to visit, in other words, but you wouldn't want to live there. This quick read is a great reminder that good children's literature creates lifelong memories that never really go away, especially for fans of a certain sunbonneted pioneer girl named Laura.

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