It's the Hello Darkness My Old Friend Edition

Greetings and welcome to the Hello Darkness My Old Friend Edition of You Are What You Read.

Tonight’s Full Moon is either known as the Full Frost Moon or The Full Beaver Moon. Full Frost because of the killing cold that is surely coming our way and Full Beaver for those traps we all need to set so we can lay in some pelts for warmth. Hop to it People! The Bad Time is coming! Are you prepared? If you want more info, you can find it here at The Farmer's Almanac.

On Sunday night we say adios to Daylight Savings Time until March 11th. What this means for you all is a trip to the hardware store and get those fresh batteries for your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Better safe than dead and sorry, People.

Also, before you go to bed turn all those clocks back an hour and while you may enjoy that extra hour of sleep, remember that while one hand giveth, another taketh away. Think on that extra hour when sunset starts happening at 4:43 plunging us into unrelenting darkness that will stretch on for months and months.

And I will now insert my annual plea for myself and my fellow commuters. Please use caution when driving at dusk and dark during the following months. We cannot do nice things for you all like story time for your kids, buying you all books to read, or sending you quasi-amusing emails every Friday at 5 if you all are playing whack-a-mole with us in the crosswalks leaving us for dead. If you see us in a crosswalk, please let us cross to safety. Please do not speed up when you see us, or swerve around us. You are in your nice warm foreign export, comfy and cozy. We are just trying to make our train in the cold and the dark. Thanks for your consideration. We’ll see the light again. Someday. Maybe.

This week we have a PI, a nurse, pretty, not-so-pretty and some jewelry. A girl’s gotta have bling People.

Let us begin!

Spunky Jill M has just finished Y is for Yesterday by Sue Grafton. “As a devoted Nancy Drew fan in my youth, I became an avid fan of Sue Grafton’s alphabet series years ago. Sue Grafton’s latest novel, Y is for Yesterday, follows private investigator Kinsey Millone through a disturbing case where four teenage boys from an elite private school film their sexual assault of their fourteen–year–old classmate. Unfortunately, I found this latest in the Millone series to be more graphic than her previous novels and little repetitive on details. Ms. Grafton has historically been a wonderful storyteller and with only Z remaining in the series, I will, however, miss reading about Kinsey Millhone’s exploits.”

Kaitlin from the Rock is here! S’up Kaitling? “Hellooo! I recently read The Wonder, by Emma Donoghue. It takes place in a small Irish village in the 1800s. Lib, a nurse trained by Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War, is assigned to observe a young girl who hasn't eaten anything in months, but is somehow still alive. She claims to only eat ‘manna from heaven.’ As visitors make pilgrimages to see this young miracle, Lib is determined to figure out how she is surviving, and how she can save her. It took me a long time to make my way through this book, but I found myself looking forward to reading it every night. Emma Donoghue tells the tale beautifully, and I recommend it if you're looking for a bit of mystery, supernatural, and a strong female lead.”

Diane is still reading pretty. Second Bloom, Cathy Graham's Art of the Table gives an inside view of the artist's creativity. Her table settings are unique and her floral arrangements are vibrant. What really caught my attention were the beautiful water colors Graham did throughout the book. This book is filled with photos and very little text. She has the reputation for being a creative hostess on the Upper East Side of New York, and on Nantucket where she spends her summers. Seasonal fruit and vegetables are used for her table settings with individual clear antique and vintage bottles her choice of vase. Catherine Graham's book is filled with photos of her charming watercolors and whimsical one-of-a-kind dinner invitations that I am sure are prized by her guests. There was a mention that she is working on a line of stationary and paper goods and I can't wait."

James has been raving about this book to anyone who will listen and now tag! You all are it! “In the same way that many poisonous animals don flamboyant colors to warn would-be predators to avoid them, I occasionally like to choose books with covers which, regardless of whether I am on a train, subway or plane, warn ‘If you strike up a conversation with me, it will be painful for the both of us.’ Last year it was Schutt’s Cannibalism (which was very successful); this year I went with Gordon’s The Second Coming of the KKK (though, it didn’t really have the intended effect this time). Instead, I got really good at rattling off a synopsis of the book before anyone could misinterpret the title in the context of the current state of heightened political aggression and take my head off (misinterpretations abounded on all sides of the political spectra). ‘The Second Coming refers to a resurgence of the KKK in the 1920s,’ I would hurriedly explain as eyes narrowed on the book and then on me. The KKK of the 1920s wasn’t bound to the South as previously, in fact the Midwest ended up being the region in which it initially flourished rebranded with its broader anti-Catholic, anti-Semitic, anti-immigrant, ‘100% American’ platform. The organization was incredibly well-funded through a pyramid-scheme structure providing fraternal-society ritualism, community engagement and, as it grew, political weight to its members; members who were no longer relegated to the cover of night. Gordon acknowledges that as a liberal, academic, Jewish, feminist, the book is not without bias nor is it apolitical, but as I will attest it is a difficult, well-researched, and eye-opening read.”

Pat T enjoyed reading, The Necklace, by Claire McMillan. This story is told in two eras both involving an exotic Indian necklace. In the 1920s when the Quincy's were wealthy land barons, Ambrose Quincy brings back the necklace to his beloved, May, only to find out his brother, Ethan, married her during his year of travel to India. In the present day, Nell Quincy, the black sheep of the tight Quincy clan is summoned to the shabby family manor when the matriarch aunt passes away. The contents of the estate are divided up among the cousins and resentment simmers when it is discovered that the ornate necklace is left to Nell. Nell comes to discover the significance of the necklace as long-ago secrets are uncovered from the past generations. This story has all the making of a good read - family rivalry, love triangle and scandal.”

Collection Call Number Availability Action
1st Fl - Detective Mystery D-M GRAFTON 4 of 4
Main St 2nd Look D-M GRAFTON 2 of 3
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overdrive
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1st Fl - Fic Fic DONOGHU 4 of 4
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overdrive
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1st Fl - Audio Fic ACD FIC DONOGHU 1 of 1
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overdrive
Collection Call Number Availability Action
2nd Fl - Home Home 642.4 SECOND 1 of 1
Provider Status Action
hoopla
Provider Status Action
hoopla
Collection Call Number Availability Action
2nd Fl - Times Times 322.4209 GORDON 1 of 1
Provider Status Action
hoopla
Collection Call Number Availability Action
1st Fl - Fic Fic MCMILLA 3 of 3

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